Phil 230 long.docx - Phil 230 Frederick lived a very...

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Phil 230 January 24, 2016 Frederick lived a very interesting life, to say the very least. Many people probably see his life in many angles, coming up with a lot of different conclusions on how Frederick lived his life and what kind of life he had with reasoning to support their conclusion. Some may wonder what is the correct way to look at Frederick’s life and why, so I will use two accounts of happiness, which are Epicurean and Stoic, to analyze Frederick’s life because these two accounts will view Frederick’s life in two very unique and contrasting ways. Then I will say which account of happiness is best after comparing each of the relative strengths and weakness of both accounts of happiness to each other. This will not be an argument of whether or not Frederick was happy during his life, this is just to show which account of happiness is truly the best. I will first start off by viewing Frederick through an Epicurean point of view and beliefs. One of the Epicurean’s main ways of thinking is how foolish death is. The Epicureans believe that death itself is nothing to fear, that “death is not a bad thing” (Epictetus4), that after death the soul cannot or become immaterial, and that the fear of death is foolish since fearing death actually causes more pain as well as suffering instead of death itself. It is clear that Frederick had no real fear of death during his life so he cleared that part for living a happy life even though he died that does not change if his life was good or not. The next criteria for a happy life for the Epicureans revolves around desire. The Epicureans believed that desire, along with fear, are the two biggest sources of suffering for us humans. While some desires are natural for us there are others that are not. In addition, the Epicureans were believers of that with the use of reasoning it is possible to erase away all the suffering that comes with desires. The power of reflection makes us happy and it is available to everyone no matter what the case is according to the Epicurean’s beliefs. For them a simple life free of desire is best and ideal for everyone on order to have a happy life. Now let’s look back at Frederick’s case regarding desire. I believe that it is safe to say that Frederick had a good amount of desires during his life. His desires were to move up the corporate ladder
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