Practical 4 - Muscular System 1 (completed).docx

Practical 4 - Muscular System 1 (completed).docx - 400868...

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400868 Human Anatomy and Physiology 1 Practical 4: Muscular System - Anatomy Introduction For this activity you will be using charts, posters, models and cadaveric specimens in the anatomy lab. You may want to bring your textbook, lecture slides and atlas for reference. These practicals will be most beneficial to you if you read through these notes prior to class and attempt the short answer questions. Topics covered: 1. Fascicular Arrangement of Skeletal Muscle Fibres 2. Skeletal Muscle Types/Classifications 3. Joint movements 4. Skeletal Muscles of the body Objectives - Identify the structural components of skeletal muscle tissue - Classify different types of skeletal muscles - Define the joint movements of the body - Identify and name important skeletal muscles of the body Complete before practical: - Read or listen to Muscular System Lecture 1 (week 6) - Read these practical notes and attempt the short answer questions Blended learning activity: When available (on vUWS), OPAL 6 and PHIZ 6 will complement this practical. The Mastering A&P website has a great collection of images of cadaveric specimens and models on PAL 3.0 . 2017- 400868 Human Anatomy and Physiology 1 | Practical 4
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Pre-practical MUSCULAR SYSTEM ANATOMY quiz (1.5 mins per slide) (Note: The questions will be provided to you by your tutor during class and this quiz does not count towards your final mark) Question Answer Notes 1.A 1.B 2.A 3.A 3B 3.C 3.D 3.E 2017- 400868 Human Anatomy and Physiology 1 | Practical 4
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The Muscular System As described in practical 2, muscle tissues are specialized for contraction – voluntary and involuntary muscle movements are vital for survival, they serve important functions including those involved in movement, breathing, blood flow, digestion and excretion. There are three muscles types found in the human body; skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle and smooth muscles. They share the common ability to turn chemical energy of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into mechanical energy of movement. Skeletal muscles are the focus in this practical, as cardiac muscle and smooth muscle will be covered in more detail in Human Anatomy and Physiology 2 (in semester 2) when other specific body systems are described, such as the cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system, urinary system, etc. 1. Fascicular Arrangement of Muscle Tissue Muscle tissue is made of "excitable" cells and is specialized for contraction – in skeletal muscle these cells make up fibres which then make up fascicles. These fascicles are arranged in various ways which determines the type (which vary in function, strength and range of motion). Label the following diagram using the following terms; bone, perimysium, muscle fascicle, endomysium, epimysium, tendon, muscle fibre, blood vessels. 2017- 400868 Human Anatomy and Physiology 1 | Practical 4 1.
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