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Annotated Biblography BUS600.docx

Annotated Biblography BUS600.docx - 1 Running Head...

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1 Running Head: COMMUNICATING AT FINGER Communicating at Finger Speed Stephani Christenson BUS 600 Management Communication with Technology Prof. Ernesto Saborio July 3, 2017
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2 COMMUNICATING AT FINGER Communicating at Finger Speed In daily life, people are bombarded with messages that they can have or do anything they want—for a price. This new, on demand market has driven adults to begin working more so that they can increase their earnings and achieve happiness. Historically, researchers have argued that employee engagement decreases when forced overtime occurs or when there is an imbalance in work-life time; but in the last two decades, Americans have been increasingly willing to blur the time between work and home time and begun working more hours in pursuit of higher earnings and titles. These increased work hours have inadvertently led to increased use of employer technology to complete online shopping, keep up with social media, make doctor appointments and send personal emails both in their normal work day and in their scheduled off time. As the line become less distinct between these two parts of an employee’s day, managers are charged with developing regulations and communication policies that protect the company’s digital information, financial responsibilities, employee autonomy, employee engagement, and developing a balance between work and life for both employees and supervisors. Keeping up with the neighbors is a trap that many have fallen into and once in it, becomes difficult to navigate a path out. In International Review of Applied Economics, Keith Cowling, et al. assert that Americans work more than their European counterparts, because Americans are more materialistic and that this becomes on endless cycle of needing to work to buy more convenience items because they are working so much. They further assert that this need for money forces many to agree to off time connectivity for fear of losing their position (2011). In comparison to most European countries, America has longer workweeks and the highest percent of workers that are working greater than 45 hours a week (Hamermesh & Stancanelli, 2015). John P. Ross, et al. states that most employees feel that “checking emails
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3 COMMUNICATING AT FINGER while at the performance of a child, taking phone calls in the evening, or working long hours is okay as long as the person feels he or she has the power to satisfy both life and work demands” (2017). Creating a satisfied workforce in today’s mobile world is less about clearly defining what hours of the day are for work and what hours of the day are for leisure, but rather is about defining the scope of the work with clearly communicated expectations about behavior and timelines and then working with the employee to set up a framework that works for both the employee and the organization’s benefit.
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