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Lit Links EDU225.docx - EDUC 225 Lit Links Assignment Where...

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EDUC 225 Lit Links Assignment Where the Wild Things Are By Maurice Sendak Lit Links by Elgin Scalzi APA Citation: Sendak, M. (1963). Where the wild things are . New York, NY: Harper & Row
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Introduction: Age Group: This book was intended for Preschool to Second Grade. Summary: Max was a disobedient child that enjoyed causing mischief in his household. It got to the point where his mother sent him to his room without having him eat his dinner first. At this point, his room became a fully formed forest and Max got onto a boat that appeared near him in an ocean. He spent almost a year in that boat, sailing to a land mass that is known to have the Wild Things inhabited. Max was able to become their king, and as their king he initiated a party. The Wild Things then were sent to sleep without any supper. Max, feeling lonely, decided to travel back to his room, where his supper was right on his bedside. Preparation: 1. Have preemptive questions ready. 2. Be prepared to speak on many different pages. Have the book as well. Include sticky- notes if necessary. 3. Have the stuffed animal-monster (the one on the cover). If disliked that idea for a prop, then choose own prop that relates to the book. 4. Be prepared to have a fun voice (“monster voice”) for when the monsters talk. 5. Have your questions prepared. 6. Have multiple activities prepared. These activities may be founded: a. On the author’s website b. On Pinterest or other relevant websites c. Any teacher books 7. Make sure that these activities are educational or serve purpose for the children. If questioned whether the activities are suitable, you can check the NYS Learning Guidelines. 8. Have each station set up for the children for post-story activities.
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9. Have a woods/forest nearby and go there when ready. 10. Have Post-Story questions prepared. 11. Have a story plan for the second time reading. Introduction: Begin this book by asking the children if they have ever gotten into an argument or kerfuffle with their parents. Let a couple of them tell what happened, as children love discussing that. Then, once two or three tell their stories (each shouldn’t be longer than a minute long), ask them what they did. Then ask if any of them ever went to the other side of the world because they were angry. They all should say no, and possibly giggle because that’s ridiculous. After this, hold up the book and ask them if they can guess what the book is about. Tell the author and name of the book. Reading the Story: Begin reading once class is silent and ready. (BR: Before reading the page. AF: After reading the page. DR: During reading the page.) Pages: Pg - 1-2: AR: “Why is he wearing that goofy-wolf costume?” Pg – 3-4: BR: “What is going on in this picture?” Pg – 7-8: BR: “What are those things in his room?” AF: “Do you have plants in your room? Do you have full size trees in your room?” Pg – 11-12: Just comment on the size of the forest in his room, and say how unbelievable it is.
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