Persuasion 2.5.ppt - Persuasion Defining Exploring Applying...

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Persuasion Defining, Exploring, & Applying
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Defining Persuasion (Persuasion —any communication involving a message intended to change, shape, or reinforce the response of another (Miller, 1980) )Exam 2 components/forms of response: Attitude (thought) Behavior (action) Implies 3 sub-processes of persuasion
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Sub-processes of Persuasion Response-changing—message/comm intended to alter an existing response Typical’ persuasion The terms attitude change & persuasion are often used interchangeably
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Sub-processes of Persuasion Response-reinforcing—comm intended to maintain or strengthen an existing response Crucial, but often overlooked domain Essential for many relational, practical, & commercial tasks
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Sub-processes of Persuasion Response-shaping—comm intended to create a desired response when there is no pre-existing response Associated with situations that can be considered ‘new’ (in a relative sense)
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Practical Considerations: Levels of Persuasion Practically we can define 2 levels of persuasion Micro—interpersonal (dyadic) Ex.—face to face, impression management Macro—mass level paradigms Ex.—advertising, public health campaigns Differences between levels: Amount/type of available info Ability to focus message Ability to provide & respond to feedback Effort & cost involved
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Persuasion Building Blocks: Attitudes & Behaviors 2 key constructs: Behaviors Tangible aspect; Directly observable Attitudes Cognitive aspect; not directly observable All persuasive goals, even those which nominally focus on attitudes , have behavioral correlates
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Persuasion Building Blocks: Attitudes & Behaviors (You don’t need to write this) So what is an attitude? Relatively enduring organization of beliefs around an object (situation) predisposing one to respond in a preferential manner (Rockeach) Attitude towards a behavior is a function of the consequences of performing that behavior and the evaluation of those consequences (Fishbein & Azjen) Summary evaluations of objects, ranging along a dimension from positive to negative (Petty) Theoretical construction created by social scientists to explain the different reactions that people have towards similar objects or situations (Stiff)
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