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Education Relating to the Tenth Amendment.docx

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Running Head: EDUCATION AND THE TENTH AMENDMENT 1 Education and the Tenth Amendment: How Education Rights are Distributed Across State and Federal Lines Abigail Smith Greenville Technical College
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EDUCATION AND THE TENTH AMENDMENT 2 Education and the Tenth Amendment: How Education Rights Are Distributed Across State and Federal Lines The tenth Amendment grants that “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people” (U.S. Const. amend. X). One such power that is not delegated to the Federal Government is the power to regulate education. This power is reserved to the States and can be shown through such displays as the Common Curriculum State Standards, alternate education laws, and the distribution of funding. Despite education being a reserved state power, the Federal Government has interpreted this reservation through desegregation, the Department of Education, the No Child Left Behind Act, and its successor the Every Student Succeeds Act (Davies, 2008). Different opinions on the advantages of more Federal intervention in education versus a more decentralized approach focusing on states or even family units exist; however, the arrangement of power regarding to education is more strongly allotted to the States, with the Federal Government becoming more involved in the past few decades. A general increase in federal power since the New Deal could relate to the slight increase of federal power regarding education and suggest a further trend of centralization. Common Curriculum State Standards is a state-run initiative that seeks to ensure that every student is learning the skills needed to succeed post-graduation (Akkus, 2016). It is divided into mathematical and literature standards. This initiative was not organized by the federal government, but by a coalition of many parties. Organizations such as the National Governor’s Association, Council of Chief State School Officers, American Council on Education, and State Higher Education Executive Officers contributed to forming these standards. Forty-three states have adopted these standards and have enacted policies to
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EDUCATION AND THE TENTH AMENDMENT 3 incorporate them into their schools (Akkus, 2016). The Common Core State Standards have been met with opinions that were both in favor and against the standards. There are criticisms regarding a lack of creativity and arts within the standards, and some may suggest that the standards, while providing a sufficient basis for education, cannot provide a full and comprehensive education while excluding arts from the standards (Gormley & McDermott, 2016). Regardless of the opinions around Common Curriculum State Standards, these standards were formed and adopted by the states. This is an expression of the states enacting the tenth amendment in regards to education.
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