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Running head: TREATING DEPRESSION WITH MEDICATION 1 Treating Depression with Medication: The Flaws of the Biological Perspective Abigail Smith Greenville Technical College
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TREATING DEPRESSION WITH MEDICATION 2 Treating Depression with Medication: The Flaws of the Biological Perspective Biological remedies are widely accepted in the treatment of depression. Antidepressants in particular have become commonplace in the world of abnormal psychology. However, antidepressants have many negatives that do not justify the use of the medications. Negative symptoms afflict many with pains that may be worse than the disorder itself. Medications treat the symptoms of a disorder but do not adequately address the underlying causes. Psychotherapy is as efficient as medication but without the drawbacks. Many biases and a dearth of information result in uninformed patients who become experiments to a variety of mind-altering drugs. The biological method is flawed and antidepressants should not be used to treat depression. Medications such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, tricyclics, and antidepressants come with a variety of side effects that can prove uncomfortable at best and deadly at worst. Haslam, Brown, Atkinson, and Haslam (2004) found that medication made patients feel worse, in a cloud, have pain, nausea, etc. These side effects to medication often were as bad as the symptoms of the disorder or worse. They found that, “Initial side effects of medication have as much negative impact on respondents’ ability to work as the symptoms of anxiety and depression” (Haslam et al., 2004). Taking medication becomes a decision between which pain the patient prefers. “A 25-year-old woman, who worked for a car leasing firm, described how medication made her feel worse: ‘I found that really hard, because I felt so awful … the tablets give you some nasty side effects of nausea…. it seems crazy that a tablet that's meant to help with those symptoms actually can make it
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TREATING DEPRESSION WITH MEDICATION 3 worse to start with’” (Haslam et al., 2004). Medication that is creating problems cannot be the optimal choice. In addition to the negative symptoms caused by the medications, there is a fear of addiction to the drugs. While there is little evidence to suggest an antidepressant or other drug is addictive, a dependency to a medication is a crippling fear to many. Haslam et al. (2004) found that “many participants experienced symptoms on occasions when they had forgotten to take
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