RamirezM_ECO372_WK2.docx - Running head SOLAR ENERGY...

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Running head: SOLAR ENERGY NON-PROFIT 1 Solar Energy Non-Profit Merranda Ramirez ECO372 June 8, 2017 Ilisha Newhouse
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SOLAR ENERGY NON-PROFIT 2 Solar Energy Non-Profit Electricity and water are two of the most important aspects of a family’s home. As families get larger, so does their utility bills. In hotter states like, Hawaii and Florida, electric bills will tend to be higher than families residing in more cooler states. Most of a family’s income goes to utilities, rent or mortgage, and bills. What if electricity and solar water heating, could be afforded to all homes, at essentially little to no cost the individuals? The question is, what if every single family could have solar panels? Whether they are “rich” or “poor” or “middle class,” they can receive renewable clean energy, at no cost. What could the quality of life be to individuals if everyone had no worry of paying an electricity bill? Life can be higher quality if Solar Energy sources because non-profit for all to access. Energy Source for All GRID Alternative is a company already on track providing non-profit solar energy to low income families. A Family in California is saving approximately $31,000 for the lifespan of the solar panels (GRID Alternative, 2015). Approximately 1,200 families have been provided solar energy as of the year 2015, saving about 40 million dollars total in electric bills (GRID Alternatives, 2015). GRID Alternative also provides battery power solar energy to other countries that do not have access to electric energy. Right now, the company offers solar to families who qualify in targeted areas with a family income below a specific spectrum. However, their vision is to provide this solar energy, energy that is clean and reusable, to everyone (GRID Alternatives, 2015). Realistically, what if everyone did have clean renewable energy available, at no cost to them? In Hawaii, a family paying approximately $367 a month on electric bills, obtains solar panels and pays monthly for the solar panels. The Solar Panels payment monthly cost is $167, that is if the family does not purchase the panels directly and choose to finance the panels.
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SOLAR ENERGY NON-PROFIT 3 The solar panels in Hawaii saves a family of four approximately $200 a month. That is totaling to approximately $2,400 in savings a year. The family only pay $19 per month to Hawaii Electric (HECO) to reserve their solar credits. HECO also has community energy farms available to those who cannot install panels on their roof. HECO’s community energy farms are available to those who cannot put panels on their roof or those who are renting (HECO, 2017). These community farms could become open to families who pay to install a system on their home to obtain the solar energy. HECO’s energy farms can be used by families who live in less “sunny” areas or those who rent a home that does not have solar panels.
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