{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

diiffusion.pptx - What is an innovation It is any idea or...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–15. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
Image of page 9

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
Image of page 11

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 12
Image of page 13

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 14
Image of page 15
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: What is an innovation? It is any idea or product perceived by the potential adopter to be new. New products are ideas, behaviour or things that are qualitatively different from existing forms ' Diffusion of Innovations is a theory of how, why, and at what rate new ideas and technology spread through cultures. The concept was first studied by the French sociologist (1890) and by German and Austrian anthropologists such as 01' Diffusion of innovation ' A process through which a new product moves from initial introduction to regular purchase and use * A process by which an innovation (idea) is communicated through certain channels overtime among the members of a social system — Everett Rogers Innovations include both a hardware and a software component The hardware are the physical and tangible aspects of a product. The software is the understanding consumers“ values and lifestyles New products in the market Every year around 5000 new products appear in the market. However, most fail and only a few remain ( around 20%). Products which are innovative. Speed of diffusion Competitive intensity Reputation of the supplier Standardised technology Vertical coordination Resource commitments Adapter classes Innovators - 2.5% Early adopters —- 13.5% Early majority — 34% Late majority — 34% Laggards — 16% E a: E § 5| El 3?. _,..‘ Innmraturs. Earlyr Ea rlyr Late Laggards 1.5 95 Adapters Majcritv Majuriw IE- 5% 13.5 H 34 96 34 E55 Innovators ' Innovators are the first individuals to adopt an innovation. Innovators are willing to take risks, youngest in age, have the highest , have great financial lucidity, very social and have closest contact to scientific sources and interaction with other innovators . Early Adepters * This is second fastest category of individuals who adopt an innovation. These individuals have the highest degree of among the other adopter categories. are typically younger in age, have a higher social status, have more financial lucidity, advanced education, and are more socially forward than late adopters Early Majority ' Individuals in this category adopt an innovation after a varying degree of time. This time of adoption is significantly longer than the innovators and early adopters. Early Majority tend to be slovver in the adoption process, have above average social status, contact with early adopters, and shovvr some Late Majority ' Individuals in this categery vvill adept an innevaticn after the average member cf the seciety. These individuals appreach an innevatien with a high degree ef skepticism and after the majerity cf seciety has adepted the innevaticn. Late Majerity are typically skeptical abeut an innevaticn, have belevv average secial status, very little financial lucidity, in ccntact with cthers in late maj erity and early maj erity, very little Laggards Individuals in this categery are the last tc adept an innevaticn. Unlike seine cf the previcus categeries, individuals in this categcry shew little tn nc epinicn leadership. These individuals typically have an aversicn te change-agents and tend tc be advanced in age. Laggards typically tend tc be fecused en “traditicns”, have lcwest sccial status, lewest financial fluidity, eldest cf all ether adepters, in ccntact with enly family and clnse friends, very little tn nc ...
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern