Basics in Sociolinguistics.ppt - Basics in Sociolinguistics...

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Lecture 1 Basics in Sociolinguistics
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Race and Ethnicity Race - Physiognomic or biological and anatomical attributes of a person. Ethnicity - Identifiers of ethnicity or ethnic status suggest people share a common nationality, common cultural history and may include race, religion and languages spoken.
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Accent vs. Dialect Accent vs. Dialect Accent - only speech sounds are marked Dialect - may involve marking of phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics Accent modification- focuses mainly on speech sound changes
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Slang Slang Different from Dialect Informal, nonstandard vocabulary Usually intelligible to only a few people May be jargon of a special group, e.g., SLPS, physicians, dentists, sailors
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Slang: Main Functions Slang: Main Functions Marks social identity Show that one belongs to a group May be used to be different Used to make an effect or to be informal Slang- also referred to as in-group language Is subject to rapid change
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Examples of Slang: The 60s Examples of Slang: The 60s guilt trip bogus lame nerd turkey airhead that’s a bummer sock it to me outta sight swell groovy fer shirr
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More 60s slang More 60s slang that’s cool that’s hip bad vibes bookin’ it grody - grody to the max where you comin’ from Hippy dippy weatherman Da devil made me do it
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Style Changes from casual to formal speech depending on the situation, listeners, location, and topic.
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Register Use of words and phrases in a unique way Baby talk Comfort talk Associated with a specific occasion May involve distinctive grammatical constructions
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Code Mixing or Code Switching Mixing of two or more languages or language varieties during speech production. Relatively stable mixture of two or more languages or varieties.
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Code Mixing or Code Switching Concurrent use of more than one language , or language variety , in conversation. Combines linguistic characteristics of two or more languages Most bilingual speakers go through this process
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Vernacular Native , first or indigenous language or dialect of a speech community or specific population such as AAVE.
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Speech Community Speech Community Group of individuals who share a set of norms and rules for language use Sometimes used interchangeably with language community. People in a speech community may not speak the same, but they share in the belief that certain linguistic markers are social markers
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Social Networks Social networks Individuals who regularly interact with each other Social Network Analysis (SNA) – the study of connections and ties used to investigate the structure of interpersonal relationships.
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