ESC. 2000 Chp 4 Quiz.docx - Question1 1/1pts...

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Question 1 1 / 1 pts A felsic or silicic magma    is formed by melting of oceanic crust.    is about 44%-50% silica.    crystallizes at the highest temperatures.    is more viscous than mafic magma. FEEDBACK: Felsic magma is more viscous than mafic magma because silica  tetrahedra link up in chains, which at the microscopic level tangle and impede smooth  flow.   Question 2 1 / 1 pts A moving, glowing, descending cloud of hot gases and volcanic pieces    has a Hawaiian name because this event is common there.    is associated with shield volcanoes.    is so rare, none occurred in the last century.    is called a pyroclastic flow or  nu é e ardente . FEEDBACK: A glowing cloud of volcanic gases and pieces is not uncommon with  explosive eruptions. Most shield   volcanoes, including those of Hawaii, are associated  with effusive, not explosive, eruptions.
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  Question 3 1 / 1 pts According to Bowen's reaction series, as a magma cools in the discontinuous series,  minerals will crystallize in which order? Click to view larger image.    Olivine, plagioclase, quartz, muscovite    Plagioclase, k-feldspar, muscovite, quartz    Muscovite, k-feldspar, biotite, amphibole    Olivine, pyroxene, amphibole, biotite FEEDBACK: As magma cools, minerals crystallize in two recognizable sequences,  continuous and discontinuous. The correct order for mineral crystallization in the  discontinuous sequence from high to low temperatures is olivine, pyroxene, amphibole,  biotite, k-feldspar, muscovite, and quartz.   Question 4 1 / 1 pts Bowen's reaction series   
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was established by laboratory experiments in the 1920s.   shows the sequence in which different sulfate minerals form during the progressive  cooling of a melt.   has a continuous series with a progressive change from sodium-rich to calcium-rich  amphibole.    creates a progressively more mafic melt as the magma cools. FEEDBACK: Bowen's reaction series shows the sequence in which different silicate  minerals form (not sulfate minerals) from a cooling mafic melt. Through crystallization of mafic minerals, the melt becomes more felsic (not more mafic). It has both a continuous and discontinuous series; the continuous series shows a progressive change from  calcium-rich to sodium rich plagioclase while a variety of different minerals form in the  discontinuous series. Bowen’s reaction series was developed by lab experiments in the  1920s by Norman Bowen.
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