ESC. 2000 Chp 6 Quiz.docx - Question1 1/1pts , building,....

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Question 1 1 / 1 pts A rock experienced melting then cooling, burial to deep depths during mountain  building, and then uplift and weathering. Which pathway did this rock take through the  rock cycle?    Sedimentary   igneous   metamorphic    Igneous   igneous   sedimentary    Metamorphic   igneous   metamorphic    Igneous   metamorphic   sedimentary FEEDBACK: The key words  melting burial , and  weathering  indicate that this pathway  involved igneous, then metamorphic, and then sedimentary rock stages.   Question 2 1 / 1 pts As they pass through the rock cycle, all atoms    remain at the same temperature and pressure.    move through the rock cycle in the same manner.    do not move through the rock cycle at the same rate.    stay within the same mineral. FEEDBACK: Atoms that move through the rock cycle do not move at the same rate.  The atoms do not necessarily stay within the same mineral, do not move in the same  manner, and do not necessarily stay at the same temperature and pressure.
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  Question 3 1 / 1 pts Different temperature and pressure ranges create specific sets of metamorphic minerals that are called metamorphic facies. Using the graph, determine what facies a rock  would be found in if it was buried 30 km deep and heated to a temperature of  approximately 200 degrees C. Click to view larger image.    Blueschist    Greenschist    Amphibolite    Hornfels FEEDBACK: This pressure-temperature combination would cause a rock to develop  minerals in the blueschist facies. This facies is usually found in subduction zones where pressures are very high, but temperatures are relatively low.  
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Question 4 1 / 1 pts During metamorphism, the process that changes the crystal structure of a mineral  without changing its chemical composition is called    phase change.    plastic deformation.    recrystallization.    pressure solution. FEEDBACK: When one mineral changes into another mineral with a different crystal  structure but same chemical composition, a phase change occurs. For example, under  high pressure, graphite transforms into diamond. Both are formed from pure carbon but  have very different crystal structures.   Question 5 1 / 1 pts Identify the metamorphic process that causes grains to warp and/or elongate but not  melt or dissolve.    Recrystallization    Plastic deformation    Phase change    Pressure solution
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FEEDBACK: During plastic deformation, grains that are subjected to stresses at high  temperatures are warped and/or elongated. The grains do not melt, nor are they broken; they simply change shape.
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