In Shakespeare.docx - Nicole Rivero Professor Schusler ENC...

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Nicole Rivero Professor Schusler ENC 1102 MW March 12, 2017 Honorable, Villain, or Neither? Shakespeare’s play Julius Caesar, introduces three distinctive characters who emerge and capture the audience’s attention by the actions and decision they commit. Brutus, an honorable patriotic man of Rome who fears of having a leader who abuses his power, Cassius, a manipulative malicious beast who is envious of Caesar, and Mark Antony, a man with the ability to sway people with the power of his words. All three men have power in three different ways and use their power to their benefit and achieve their goals. In act 1 scene 1, the people of Rome are celebrating Caesar’s triumph. As Caesar and the citizens decide to go see the race, Cassius and Brutus stay behind. Cassius, who is a good reader of other people, begins to inform Brutus his feelings towards Caesar and the possibility of Caesar becoming a dictator. Brutus pays mind to this since he himself has thought about this particular thought numerous of times. Cassius tells Brutus that Caesar is a mortal like they all are, suffers as much as they do, and has the same amount weaknesses, and he cannot believe that people admire him as if he was some god,” Did I the tired Caesar. And this man is now become a god, and Cassius is a wretched creature and must bend his body if Caesar carelessly but nod on him” (act 1, scene 2, page 6, line 118). He also flatters him suggesting no matter what Brutus says or does, he will do what’s right in the end because Brutus is a man with a true heart. Brutus is depicted and a man with reason meaning he will do something if the reason is right. ` In Brutus’s first soliloquy act 2, scene 1, page 1, line 10, he contemplates the only way in not having another dictator is to kill Caesar. He thinks to himself and knows he has no personal motive to kill him, only for the good of the people because he does not want Rome to fall. Brutus
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