hush.docx - David Tran Professor Zane WGSS 1105 Sec 18 A...

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David Tran Professor Zane WGSS – 1105 Sec 18 January 13, 2018 A Feminist Film Analysis of Hush When thinking of films of the horror genre, the stereotypical slasher film will always have the sexy couple, usually with the “jock” and the “pretty girl”. Then there is the “dumb one” or sometimes replaced with the “nerd,” relieving the tense murderous atmosphere with comedic relief. Next is the “nice guy,” who is seemingly one of the final characters to live throughout the film managing to somehow “kill” the bad guy, only to die by the presumed to be dead killer. Finally, there is the final girl, the last of the group to survive, only to be forced to stop depending on the “nice guy,” stops running away and manages to kill the bad guy. Although this may seem to be a good thing for some feminists, that the main protagonist is female, it does not “do its justice” representing the feminist movement. However, the horror slasher film, Hush , takes these stereotypes and throws them out of the window. This would set itself as one of the most hardcore pieces of feminist cinema. The plot follows a female author, Madison “Maddie” Young, played by Kate Siegel, who was left to be deaf and mute due after contracting meningitis as a teenager. She is seen cooking in her isolated home when she is visited by her friend and neighbor, Samantha, who is returning a copy of Maddie’s book. While they are communicating through sign language, Maddie’s kitchen starts to smoke setting off a special alarm that disperses a blinding light and deafening beeps. Just only in the first five minutes of the film, just by the visuals, the viewers receives a strong sense of independence. Although Maddie has disabilities, she is able to live independently, being able to afford a home from her earnings as an author. This sends a strong message for feminists and the feminist movement as women are at a disadvantage in society, as men are
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typically seen as more capable, having women to depend on them. Also, as an independent, there is no stereotypical “nice guy” to depend on. Later that night, Maddie is seen trying to talk to a romantic interest, however, it seems that she is struggling to know what to say to him. This brings reality to romantic relationships as it does not “sugar coat” it like most films. This also relates to the
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