Chemistry lab report 10 .docx

Chemistry lab report 10 .docx - Name Precious Lin...

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Name: Precious Lin Instructor: Professor Neth Partner: Stephanie Burns Week Ten: 03/26/2018 Due Date: 04/02/2018 Alkaline earths (Groups IIA) and Halogens (Group VIIA)
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Objective of the experiment: To determine the reactivity of Alkaline Earth Halide so as to identify the unknown by observing the solubility of salts of the alkaline earths to see the formation of the precipitate; determining the relative oxidizing powers of halogens by adding 1 ml bromine water and 1 ml HEX along with the halogen solution. Theory: Observe the color change of residue to see whether the sample is hydrate. Different sample has different reaction under heating. We can also determine whether or not the sample is a hydrate by looking at its reversibility. A hydrate is a compound that contains water. A compound without water, where the water is driven out of the compound is called anhydrous, and we can determine different types of hydrates. Mole ratios were used in this lab to determine the ratio of water to the anhydrate, and calculate the formula of the hydrate. X2(oxidized form) + 2Y-(reduced form) → 2 X- (new halide) + Y2(new Halogen) Results: Part A: Unknown with H2SO4 - S/ Na2CO3 - R/ (NH4)2C2O4 - R/ KIO3 - S Part B: Unknown with B2 - R/ Cl2- R/ I2 - NR The cation present in our unknown was Ca2+ and the anion present was I-. The chemical formula for our unknown is CaI2. Procedure: Part A: 6 samples of 0.5g each were taken by using the spatula and place it in small test tubes. Heat each one for 30 seconds to observe if there is water and record the
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color of residue. Then fill in water to observe if it is soluble and note the color of the residue solution. Finally, we can decide if it is hydrate. Part B: Measure 0.5g of CoCl2 hexahydrate. Use only the porcelain-evaporating dish to heat the CoCl2 hexahydrate. Observe for the color change. Then add water to the anhydrous form after the dish has cooled and observe for the change again.
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