wk-2-lecture-identifying-training-needs-and-planning-2 (2).pptx

Wk-2-lecture-identifying-training-needs-and-planning-2 (2).pptx

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Learning and Talent Development Week 2: Identifying Needs and Planning Interventions Dr Luke Fletcher Work and Organisational Psychology Group [email protected]
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Identification of needs, set objectives, plan strategy Consider learning and psychological processes Design and Delivery of L&TD intervention Evaluation of L&TD intervention Systematic Training Cycle
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Overview of Lecture Outline what training needs analysis is Describe the different types of training needs Explain the process of identifying training needs at the organisational, task, and person level Expanding upon traditional TNA – appreciative inquiry as a complementary approach Planning a strategy and considering stakeholders
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Identifying Training Needs Training needs arising from change - Short and longer term business objectives: new products / markets; new operations; downsizing; multi- skilling etc. Training needs arising from work problems - productivity; quality standards; complaints; turnover and absenteeism etc.
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Employee Initiated Training Request Define performance gap Training request Is the reason for the performance gap understood? Is it due to missing knowledge? No – suggest an alternative strategy Yes – conduct a full TNA
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Types of Training Need Skill in: serving customers, report writing, problem solving, leadership Attitudes/behaviours to: work, customers, health and safety, training, the employing organisation Knowledge of: policies, procedures, technical standards, operation of equipment The competency based approach underpinning L&TD Knowledge Skills and Abilities Attitudes and Behaviours Competency
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What is knowledge? Distinction between general and specific knowledge. Can be further broken down into: Declarative knowledge – explicit ‘factual’ knowledge Procedural knowledge – the direct application of knowledge to a task Tacit knowledge – knowledge that is difficult to transfer, in written or verbal communication, to another person. Essentially knowledge is the process of understanding information and applying that understanding within a given context (Winteron et al., 2005; Gold et al., 2014). But there is some knowledge that has particular power and currency
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What is knowledge? Levels Taken from Bierly, Kessler, and Christensen, 2000, p.598
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What are skills and abilities? Definition Proctor and Dutta (1995, p.18) define skill as “goal-directed, well-organized behavior that is acquired through practice and performed with economy of effort”. As skill increases, the person will experience fewer cognitive demands and so will perform their jobs quicker and with more accuracy. Skill develops: over time, with practice in response to some demand in the external environment when components of behaviour are structured into coherent patterns Abilities are similar to skills, but they are considered more innate in nature and less goal-directed, although they can be developed over time, e.g. ability to run fast.
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What are skills and abilities? Types In its most basic sense, skills and abilities are focused around:
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