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Leture6b_student test 2.pptx

Leture6b_student test 2.pptx - Lecture 6 Civil Rights Key...

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Lecture 6: Civil Rights
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Key terms Civil rights Equal Protection Clause Black codes Civil Rights Act of 1866 Citizenship clause Jim Crow laws Separate-but-equal doctrine Equal Rights Amendment Voting Rights Act 1965 Americans with Disabilities Act 1990 Obergefull v. Hodges (2015) Civil Rights Cases of 1883 Poll tax Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) Nineteenth amendment Brown v. Board of Education Civil Rights Act of 1964 de jure discrimination de facto discrimination Equal Pay Act of 1963 Strict scrutiny Intermediate scrutiny Glenn v. Brumby ( 2011) 2
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Reminder: Civil liberties vs. civil rights Civil liberties are the personal guarantees and freedoms that government cannot abridge, either by law, constitution, or judicial interpretation. Civil rights provide freedom from arbitrary or discriminatory treatment by the government or individuals 3
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Civil Rights Equal treatment: free from unfair treatment or discrimination in various settings including education, housing, and employment Based on legally protected characteristics Positive actions by government to create equal conditions for all 4
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Civil Rights Legislation Laws that provide for civil rights usually begin or originate at the federal level Or they come about through Supreme Court decisions States can and do pass their own civil rights laws that are usually similar to laws at the federal level 5
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Reconstruction amendments 13 th : abolished slavery 14 th (Due process clause, privileges and immunities clause, citizenship clause, equal protection clause) 15 th : prohibits federal and state governments from denying any citizen the right to vote based on their race, colour or previous condition of servitude. 6
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Fourteenth Amendment Citizenship clause : “All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside.” The equal protection clause declares that all people get the equal protection of the laws Already discussed privileges and immunities clause and due process clause 7
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Fifteenth Amendment prohibits federal and state governments from denying any citizen the right to vote based on their race, color, or previous condition of servitude. This only applied to MALES. 8
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Southern Resistance to Reconstruction Amendments Black codes : denied most legal rights to newly freed slaves by prohibiting African-Americans from: Voting Sitting on juries appearing in public places (vagrancy laws) 9
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Civil Rights Act 1866 Recall the Dred Scott v. Sandford decision from last unit Civil Rights Act 1866 : declared that people born in the United States and not subject to any foreign power are entitled to be citizens, without regard to race, color, or previous condition of slavery or involuntary servitude.
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