concussion testing.pdf - Payton Johnson Professor Fabri...

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Payton Johnson Professor Fabri Intro to Sport Management November 2nd, 2013 Concussion Testing for Athletes In all sports, you are bound to get hurt. Some injuries are not as serious as others, but it happens. It is likely you can bounce back from breaking a bone, but when it comes to concussions; you could be out for the rest of your life. Concussions often happen the most in contact sports, such as; football, basketball, soccer, lacrosse, boxing, wrestling, and so forth. More than three million concussions happen each year in the United States. Emergency rooms treat about one hundred thirty five thousand sport related brain injuries a year among children ages five to eighteen. A child’s brain isn’t fully developed until they are twenty- five, so it is very important to make sure they get special attention and take extra caution (Hart, John.) A concussion at a young age, in a young athlete, can affect how they perform in the long run. A concussion is a head injury that can happen from any type of blow to the head. When a blow to the head happens is means that the head is shaking and causes the brain to slam against the skull, with so much force that the fluid to cushion the impact will not stop it (Fink, Dustin 2011) The symptoms an athlete should be aware of are headaches, nausea, dizziness, difficulty remembering/ focusing, feeling sleepy at all hours of the day, or intense mood swings (Winston, Flaura 2012) When someone experiences a blow to the head, they have to go see a doctor. The doctor will go through the steps of making sure they exactly know what happened, and since memory loss can happen they ask basic questions such as “What year is it?”, “What’s your mother’s name?”, and so on, to make sure they’re memory is still there (Biros, 2013.) The doctor will then will test for vision and hearing difficulties and coordination. A common test
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for balance and coordination is having the patient stand on one leg and have the patient touch their nose with their finger, while alternating arms. Another test a doctor or trainer will do is read a list of words, then have the patient read them back in the same order, or backwards. This helps memory, focusing and concentration. If these results are not good then the doctor or trainer will request a head CT scan or an MRI of the brain. A CT scan (cranial computed tomography) uses x-rays to develop pictures of the head, including the skull, brain, eye sockets, and the sinuses. A MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a scan of
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