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ESC. 2000 Chp 11 Quiz.docx - Question1 1/1pts Asealrock...

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Question 1 1 / 1 pts A seal rock   must lie beneath the reservoir rock to keep oil from filtering downward.     has high porosity and high permeability.    is a necessary component of an oil trap.   is commonly made of fractured limestone or poorly cemented sandstone.  FEEDBACK: Rocks made of fractured limestone or poorly cemented sandstone are  good reservoir rocks, not seal rocks. Because oil is less dense than rock, oil rises to the  surface rather than leaking downward. Thus, the porosity and permeability of a seal  rock must be low for the seal rock to prevent the oil from rising further.   Question 2 1 / 1 pts A seismic-reflection profile   is used even by amateurs looking for oil because it is relatively easy and cheap.    is created by interpreting waves reflected off the atmosphere.   shows the shapes and depths of underground sedimentary layers.    is essentially the same thing as a geologic map. FEEDBACK: A seismic-reflection profile is created by interpreting reflected underground seismic waves and shows the shapes and depths of rock layers underground. The 
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surveys typically cost millions of dollars and must be conducted by experts. A geologic  map shows rock layers and geologic structures on Earth's surface.   Question 3 1 / 1 pts A typical reservoir rock, into which oil has migrated and collected, is    highly porous and permeable.     subjected to temperatures and pressures called the oil window.    impermeable.     granite.  FEEDBACK: Sandstone is a good reservoir rock because it is porous and permeable.  Granite is impermeable and would not permit oil to move into or through it. Source rocks are subjected to the temperatures and pressures of the oil window, which are required  for the formation of oil, but source rocks cannot act as reservoir rocks because they  have low porosity and permeability. Reservoir rocks do not have to be subjected to the  oil window because oil migrates into them.   Question 4 1 / 1 pts A typical source rock for oil, which starts out as mud in which dead organic matter  settles, is    sandstone.     conglomerate.     shale. 
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   granite.  FEEDBACK: The heat associated with the formation of granite is too intense for oil.  Conglomerate and sandstone don't represent the oil-forming environment, which is mud settling to the bottom of standing water.   Question 5 1 / 1 pts As organic material is compacted to form coal, which stages does it pass through, from  first to last?
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