class-notes.pdf solids1.pdf - Expected Outcomes At the end...

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Expected Outcomes At the end of this course, you should be able to; Solve simple problems relating to elastic stress and strain. Determine the mechanical properties of a material by performing a tensile test. Design simple uniaxial loaded members such as those with variable cross-sections, non- uniform loads, thermal stresses and strains. Calculate stresses and change in dimensions of thin walled pressure vessels. Design and analyze shafts subjected to simple elastic torsion. Sketch shear force and bending moment diagrams of beams and understand their impor- tance in analysis and design. Course Outline Concepts of stress and strain: Definition of stress and strain, components of stress, direct strain, true stress and true strain. Stress and strain in simple shear; elastic stress-strain re- lationships in simple shear. Behavior of materials under static loading: The tensile test; load extension diagram; the stress-strain diagram and Engineering properties of materials, Linear elasticity and Hookes law, elastic limit, 0.2% proof stress, ultimate strength, secant and tan- gent modulus, stress hysteresis, toughness, ductility, brittleness, upper and lower yield points, allowable or working stress, safety factor. Tension instability. Elastic constants; Youngs mod- ulus of elasticity, Poissons ratio, relationships between elastic constants. Volumetric strain. Analysis of design in simple tension and compression: Deflection of axially loaded structures, members with variable cross-sections, composite members, non-uniform stresses and strains, impact loading. Thermal stresses and strains. Statically indeterminate axial members. Analy- sis of thin-walled pressure vessels: Hoop and longitudinal stresses and strains for cylinder and sphere, volumetric strain, bulk modulus of contained fluid, and pressure effects. Elastic torsion analysis: The torsion test, solid and hollow circular shafts, shear stresses, power transmission and design of shafts, coupling design, shafts of varying cross-section, composite shafts. Torsion stiffness. Pure shear. Analysis of statically indeterminate shafts. Application to close-coiled helical springs. Bending of beams: Simply supported beams and cantilevers. Concentrated loads, distributed loads and couples. Reactions at supports; shear force and bending moment and their importance for analysis and design. Qualitative and quantitative sketching of shear force and bending moment diagrams.
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Chapter Coverage 1. Stress and Strain; 2. Structures - Analysis of pin-jointed frames; 3. Analysis of thin-walled pressure vessels (cylinders and spheres) - Hoop and longitudinal stresses and stains, Volumetric strains 4. Torsion in shafts and thin-walled tubes 5. Analysis of close coiled helical springs. 6. Thermal stresses and strains.
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