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Running head: CONFLICT RESOLUTION 1 Conflict Resolution in the Perioperative Setting Danielle Tharp Chamberlain College of Nursing NR447: Collaborative Healthcare March 2018
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CONFLICT RESOLUTION 2 Conflict Resolution in the Perioperative Setting As healthcare professionals we must learn to deal with conflict on daily basis, it is vital to quality care and improved patient outcomes. Conflict can take away time and energy that should’ve been spent on the patient. Taking this crucial time away from the patient can ultimately lead to neglect or even harm to the patient. Collaboration is frequently used during a conflict to reach an agreement, which is often true of the nurse-physician collaboration. In an ideal world the nurse-physician relationship should always use collaboration in their interactions with one another. However, the nurse-physician relationship is complex and not always that simple. Each person may come from a different point of view, have confusion about their roles or even in some cases there is a certain amount of competition. According to The Institute for Safe Medication Practices (2014), disruptive and intimidating behaviors can foster medical errors, increase cost of care, cause staff to seek new positions in another unit or at another hospital, and it can contribute to poor patient outcomes and to preventable adverse outcomes. Ultimately, the goal should always be about what is the best for the patient and not the staff or physician. The Conflict The most common conflict we have in the operating room is disruptive behavior from some of our surgeons. It is well known within the department who the difficult surgeons are, because no one wants to work with them. Recently, one of our older general surgeons had a full day of surgeries booked, and one of the surgeries posted was an axillary lymph node dissection on the left. This older surgeon is known all over for just how difficult he can be and has developed quite the reputation. He has been caught yelling at staff, throwing instruments, bullying the staff into getting what he wants, and will snap when you ask him a question about his case. Even though the posting sheet says it’s on the left side that can always change when we
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CONFLICT RESOLUTION 3 go over to the prep room and read what has been written on the consent by the surgeon. In addition, before any patient comes back to the operating room the surgeon must write an interval history & physical and mark the patient if laterality is involved, anesthesia must write a pre- procedure note, there must be an original history & physical within 30 days, and labs drawn within 90 days. The nurse who had this surgeon’s room for the day came to the prep room to get her patient for the left axillary lymph node dissection and noted upon arrival that the patient was marked on the left axilla and that the consent stated the left side was to be operated on. The nurse interviewed the patient and the patient stated it was her left side that would be operated on.
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