2.05 Science and You.docx - 2.05 Science You Example 1(5...

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2.05 Science & You Example 1 (5 points) A team of researchers are working on a project to make a new kind of airplane fuel. During their experiment, there was an explosion that destroyed the lab. While they were cleaning up the debris, they discovered a number of pieces of frozen metal. The scientific community was amazed. The researchers were so excited to report that they had discovered a fuel that burns so hot that it becomes cold. They were not sure of the true importance of their discovery but they knew it was something that had never been seen before. The researchers quickly wrote up a report, created a press release, and applied for a patent. The news spread quickly through the world wide scientific community and soon other scientists were trying to replicate their experiment. Much to the relief of the original team or researchers, no other scientist could ever replicate their find. Would this example be considered science or pseudoscience? Support your decision with at least three reasons. Due to the scientist not being able to provide evidence displaying the reason for fuel’s explosion, this example can be considered Psuedoscience. First, the scientist’s lack of knowledge. Second, the scientists lack of ability to test their product. Third, the statement does not meet the requirements of following the scientific method.
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Example 2 (5 points) Researchers at a university want to know if higher levels of nitrogen in fertilizer will increase the production of tomatoes per plant. Twenty plants are given normal levels of nitrogen and twenty other plants are given ten percent higher levels throughout the growing season. The plants receive the same levels of sunlight, water and are planted in the same soil on one farm. At the end of the experiment the average number of tomatoes produced is the same for each group. The scientists repeat the experiment on two additional farms further south that season. The researchers conclude that increasing nitrogen levels
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