Accessing_and_Distributing_Japanese_TV_Drama.doc

Accessing_and_Distributing_Japanese_TV_Drama.doc -...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Re-distributing Japanese Television Dorama : The Shadow Economies and Communities around Online Fan Distribution of Japanese Media Fans have long played essential roles in popularising Japanese media texts abroad. 1 The creative work undertaken by fans of anime, for example, proved the market for anime in countries from Russia to the USA. 2 Fans’ creative and participatory practices are therefore often the starting point for vibrant and growing global audiences for Japanese media ranging from manga and anime through to video gaming and pop music. 3 The relative visibility of fans’ frequently subaltern, and sometimes subversive, online work in the contemporary period has, however, begun to bring fans into conflict with industry, with US distributors in particular tending to frame these active fan behaviours as piracy. 4 However, within this increasingly fractious media distribution picture, some fan distribution of Japanese media still tends to go unnoticed by industry. Fans’ distributive work around Japanese dorama (television drama series) is an increasingly significant example of this sort of seemingly ‘invisible’ distribution. Popular across Asia since the 1990s, 5 Japanese television dorama are usually hour-long shows, often featuring Japanese stars, and can come in a wide range of genres. They are frequently designed to be the basis of franchises, with film spin-offs, extensive merchandising opportunities and popular theme songs sung by high profile Japanese artists. Darrell William Davis and Emilie Yueh-yu Yeh have argued that television programmes in Japan are now the driving force within Japanese media production, claiming that: ‘Television is the great multiplier: fertile seed for moving images and narratives to sprout, grow and migrate to allied markets like internet, games, mobile phones and cinema.‘ 6 Consequently, the Japanese television industry’s relative disinterest in the online re- distribution of subtitled versions of their popular shows is somewhat surprising. Three key factors may suggest reasons for this disinterest: first, the ongoing anti-piracy efforts around 1
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Japanese dorama are focused on Asia rather than the English-speaking world. Koichi Iwabuchi claims that, ‘The underground market route of pirated software has played an even more significant role in transnationally popularizing Japanese TV dramas’ than the work of Japanese distributors in the region. 7 Iwabuchi is noting the Japanese television industry’s disinclination to investigate foreign markets, which may help to explain why they do not regularly shut down fan distribution work. Additionally, this historical geographic focus on Asian piracy suggests that the Japanese television industry has not been looking at online distribution as a major area of profit ‘leakage’.
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern