Introduction The Blood Never Dried.pdf

Introduction The Blood Never Dried - The post-war...

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Unformatted text preview: The post-war crisis, 1916-26 100 The Irish struggle 101; The revolt in Egypt, 1919 107' Holding India by the sword” 109; War in Iraq 116' l The Chinese Revolution, 30 May 1925 119 l The Palestine revolt 122 Zionism and Imperialism 122; The mandate 125' The road to revolt 128; The Great Revolt 1 132‘ ’ The Great Revolt, 2 135; Defeat and aftermath 139 Quit India 141 India and the Labour Party 144; Towards “Quit India” 147' Quit India 151' “The final ‘ , Jud ement 0 B ' ’ ' ‘ ” The end of British rule 159 g n rmSh R1116 m Indla 157; iI‘he-Suez. invasion: losing the Middle East 164 raman 011 165; Egypt and the Canal Zone 168' N Agsser and the road to war 171; Collusion and invasion 174' ermath 179; The Iraqi endgame 181 , Malaya and the Far East 198 The First Vietnam War 199; : forgotten intervention: Indonesia 1945-46 201' eoc ‘ ' , cupying Malaya 205, The emergency 207; Confrontation 211 Introduction: the blood never dried N 2003 Niall Ferguson published his Empire: How Britain Made The IModern World, a volume intended to capture the spirit of the times. Empires and imperialism were being celebrated as a duty that pow- erful states owed to their weaker brethren. This duty was to be put into effect with catastrophic consequences with the invasion of Iraq. Ferguson followed this bestselling volume with another one, Colossus: The Rise and Fall of the American Empire, establishing himself as a latter day Rudyard Kipling, urging the American ruling class to take up “the white man’s burden” .’ One problem with contemporary apologists for empire, however, is their reluctance to acknowledge the extent to which imperial rule rests on coercion, on the policeman torturing a suspect and the sol- dier blowing up houses and shooting prisoners. It is the contention of this book that this is the inevitable reality of colonial rule and, more particularly, that a close look at British imperial rule reveals episodes as brutal and shameful as in the history of any empire. Indeed, a case in point is the methods the British used to suppress the Mau Mau rebellion in Kenya in the 19505. This is especially pertinent, because in a personal reminiscence Ferguson tells his readers that "thanks to the British Empire, my earliest childhood memories are of colonial Africa”. His father worked for two years in Kenya after independence, but as he observes, “scarcely anything had changed...We had our bungalow, our maid, our smattering of Swahili—and our sense of 7 ...
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