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Academic and non acad dishonesty relational study...

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Academic and Non-Academic Dishonesty: A Relational Analysis of Four-Year College Students Genie Black Arkansas Tech University
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Abstract This study investigates the relationship between academic dishonesty and non-academic dishonesty as it relates to money, relationships and cheating. Students from a small campus in the south were randomly selected to participate in this study. Each participant received a survey via e- mail and/or in the classroom. Of 292 surveys sent, 136 surveys were completed. The study examines three hypotheses. Hypothesis 1: High scores on the academic dishonesty survey will correlate positively with scores on the relationship part of the survey. Hypothesis 2: High scores on the academic dishonesty survey will correlate positively with scores on the money dishonesty part of the survey. Hypothesis 3: High scores on the academic dishonesty survey will correlate positively with scores on the cheating part of the survey. The survey is comprised of 30 items and uses a four-point Likert response scale. Results support all three hypotheses.
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Academic and Non-Academic Dishonesty: A Relational Analysis of Four-Year College Students Introduction Academic dishonesty is a prevalent problem among college students all over the country. Cheating on tests and papers is becoming increasingly common in college and university settings while, at the same time, dishonesty in non-academic areas of life is becoming an enormous problem. Major corporations (e.g., Enron, Arthur Anderson, Citibank and so on) have been caught in unethical and illegal scams all based on greed for the almighty dollar. These, and other, corporations are destroying the lives of citizens through the fraudulent monetary and accounting schemes they have engaged in without thought of consequences. On a much lower level, we are all aware that individuals lie on their taxes, cheat on their spouses, deceive their loved ones and fabricate the truth at work. Perhaps, then, it’s no wonder that our college students are dishonest in academia – it seems to be the way the world works and the means to get ahead. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between cheating in academics and cheating in life. Specifically, three hypotheses will be tested: Hypothesis 1: students who score high on the academic dishonesty scale are more likely to score high on the relationship dishonesty part of the survey; Hypothesis 2: students who score high on the academic dishonesty scale are more likely to score high on the money dishonesty part of the survey; Hypothesis 3: students who score high on the academic dishonesty scale are more likely to score high on the lying part of the survey. Literature Review Many studies (e.g. Kidwell, et. al., 2003; McCabe & Trevino, 1996; Allen, Fuller & Luckett, 1998; Wilfried, 2002) have reported that students are engaged in academic dishonesty at ever-increasing levels. Historically, academic dishonesty dates back to the time when the Chinese Civil Service exam was administered thousands of years ago during an era when cheating was punishable by death (Bushway & Nash, 1977). By the late 1800s/early 1900s, cheating was
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