Eye Exercises to Increase Attention and Reduce Impulsivity.doc

Eye Exercises to Increase Attention and Reduce Impulsivity.doc

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Eye Exercises to Increase Attention and Reduce Impulsivity. By Daniel T. Moore, Ph.D. Copyrighted 2000 The symptoms of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) include inattentiveness and impulsivity. Being inattentive means that you cannot pay attention to a topic or task for very long unless it is very stimulating (e.g., video games). Impulsivity is doing whatever comes to the mind without thinking about the consequences. Eyes have an important role in attention skills. Some scientist have observed that when the eyes are focused on a task, the person is able to concentrate. When the eyes shift their gaze, the mind automatically processes another thought. At this point the child may lose attention and get off task. This shift or movement of the eyes in some ADHD individuals is automatic and seemingly not under the person's control. An observed characteristic of some ADHD individuals is their inability to follow simple instructions related to focusing visually on two objects in succession. When asked to look at a red pencil and then at a green pencil and back to a red pencil, they often look at the other pencil before instructed to do so. This behavior is called visual impulsivity. It is simple to measure and easily observed. Improvements in this behavior are easily monitored as well. The goal in this paper is to describe two exercises that improve visual attention skills and decrease visual impulsivity. The long range goal of these exercises is to improved productivity in completing homework and listening to instruction. To our knowledge, these exercises have yet to be tested in scientific research. They have been used in practice with favorable results being described by parents, teachers and children. Impulsive eyes. Many impulsive children have impulsive eyes. This means that it is difficult for them to hold their eyes on a fixed point until told to shift their gaze to another point. It is simple to test if a child has this ability or not. Test. To test if a child has this ability, simply take two pencils and place them 16 inches in front of the child's face. The pencils should be placed about shoulder length apart. Each pencil should look different (e.g., one green the other red). Instruct the child to first look at the red pencil. After a second
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  • Fall '17
  • PROF FRED
  • Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, impulsivity

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