Vana_Bhat_Mokhtarian_15Nov07.doc

Vana_Bhat_Mokhtarian_15Nov07.doc - On Modeling the Choices...

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On Modeling the Choices of Work-Hour Arrangement, Location and Frequency of Telecommuting Prasad Vana The University of Texas at Austin Dept of Civil, Architectural & Environmental Engineering 1 University Station C1761 Austin, TX 78712-0278 Tel: 512-870-7738, Fax: 512-475-8744 E-mail: [email protected] Chandra Bhat* The University of Texas at Austin Dept of Civil, Architectural & Environmental Engineering 1 University Station C1761 Austin, TX 78712-0278 Tel: 512-471-4535, Fax: 512-475-8744 E-mail: [email protected] and Patricia Lyon Mokhtarian Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Associate Director, Institute of Transportation Studies University of California, Davis Davis, CA 95616 Tel: 530-752-7062, Fax: 530-752-7872 E-mail: [email protected] * Corresponding author. The research in this paper was undertaken and completed when the corresponding author was a Visiting Professor at the Institute of Transport and Logistics Studies, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Sydney.
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Vana, Bhat, and Mokhtarian ABSTRACT A comprehensive model of three distinct dimensions of work-related choices is proposed in this study. The different choice dimensions considered are work-hour arrangement, location, and frequency of telecommuting. Such a model underscores the role of employee work-hour arrangement in telecommuting choices by bringing out the differences in preferences for telecommuting frequency (both home and center-based) between employees with different work- hour arrangements. The model is applied using data from a survey of San Diego city employees conducted in 1992. The results indicate the importance of modeling work-related decisions as a joint choice rather than examining individual dimensions of work decisions in isolation. Keywords: Telecommuting, work-hour arrangement, location and frequency of telecommuting, nested logit model, multinomial logit model
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Vana, Bhat, and Mokhtarian 1 1. INTRODUCTION Traffic congestion is one of the foremost problems faced by the urban and suburban dwellers of today. A recent study conducted by TTI (Schrank and Lomax, 2005) indicates that the cost of congestion in the U.S. has increased from $12.5 billion in 1982 to $63.1 billion in 2003 and that, in the same period of time, the number of urban areas with more than 20 hours of delay per peak traveler has grown from 5 to 51. Urban planners and policy makers have hence been constantly exploring options to mitigate traffic congestion and to improve air quality. Telecommuting is one such option that has received substantial attention and has been studied with considerable interest in the recent past. Telecommuting can be defined as working at home or at a location close to home instead of commuting to a conventional work location (Mannering and Mokhtarian, 1995). Mokhtarian et al. (2005) highlight the lack of consensus over the definition of telecommuting and hence the total number of telecommuters in the US. They review a variety of definitions, and estimates of the amounts of telecommuting presented in a number of different studies. For example, they mention the American Housing Survey count of 5.6 million people telecommuting
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