eth305v MULTICULTURAL_1500835192156.pdf - 1 Dene the...

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1. Define the following concepts and give an example: Prejudice- Prejudice encompasses the unreasonable feelings, opinions or a±tudes, especially of a hos²le nature, directed against a group other than your own. Example: “I don’t like Indians because they are shrewd” Mul²cultural educa²on Mul²cultural educa²on is a broad concept that encompasses ethnic studies, mul²ethnic educa²on and an²racist educa²on. It consists of educa²onal reform that is designed to recast the school environment so that many different kinds of groups, including ethnic groups, women and learners with special needs will experience educa²onal equality and academic parity. Discrimina²on This is the differen²al treatment of individuals or groups based on categories such as race, ethnicity, gender, social class or excep²onality. Example: “Woman cannot enroll for engineering programmes: Stereotypes A stereotype is a simple, rigid and generalized descrip²on of a person or group. When a stereotyped descrip²on is a³ached to a racial, cultural or na²onal group, there is o´en the group’s implica²on that the characteris²cs are gene²cally determined and so cannot be changed. Stereotypes influence people’s percep²ons of and behavior towards different groups. Example: “Fat people are lazy”, “Boxers are dumb”, The Japanese are intelligent”. Racism Racism is the belief that one’s own race is superior to another. This belief is based on the false premise that physical a³ributes of a racial group determine intellectual characteris²cs as well as social behaviour. Example Only white people can be scien²sts Culture Culture is a learned, socially transmi³ed heritage of artefacts, knowledge, beliefs and norma²ve expecta²ons that provides the members of a par²cular society with tools of coping with recurrent problems. Shared pa³erns of informa²on that a group uses in order to generate meaning. Associated with material goods and artefacts or with obvious visual aspects such as food and dress. Example: The Zulu, the Xhosa culture etc. 2. Discuss the kinds of expecta²ons that teachers can have of learners (4)
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Behavioural expecta²ons These include expecta²ons or predic²ons about self-control, leadership and social behaviour, e.g. teachers may expect some learners to display noisy and disrup²ve behaviour, and others to be quiet and shy. Performance expecta²ons These involve expecta²ons about intelligence, work effort, capabili²es and mo²va²on. These expecta²ons are not only limited to scholas²c abili²es but include judgments about the learner’s talents in other areas such as sport, music and drama. 3. Discuss the strategies teachers can use in the forming of expecta²ons (4) Believe that every learner can succeed Praise learners, especially those with limited ability or who are discouraged Be inclusive Establish trust so that learners feel safe to express feelings
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