Cinema History mod8-3.pps - Cinema History Hollywood in...

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Cinema History Hollywood in Transition (1948-1968) To New Hollywood (1980-Present)
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Hollywood in Transition 1948-1968 Marlon Brandon in On the Waterfront (1954) which received twelve Academy Award nominations and won eight. In 1989, On the Waterfront was selected for preservation by the United States National Film Registry.
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A Hard Period to Define The Period between the end of World War II (1946) and the industrywide adoption of the MPAA Voluntary Movie Rating System (1968) resists an easy label The contract system that had been so popular with the big studios begins to come apart with the advent of the post-war economy The signature studio styles (i.e. MGM’s musicals) that had characterized classical Hollywood became less meaningful or distinct
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Decline of the Big Studios The industry was severely weakened in 1948 when a federal anti-trust suit against the five major and three minor studios ended in the “Paramount decrees” This changed the way that studios had financed their films Television is invented and is a direct competitor (more on this in the next module) Paramount Pictures was one of the hardest hit studies in what became known as the “Paramount decrees” Video Lecture
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House Un-American Activities Committee Film content began to become strongly influenced by the fear of communism that pervaded the United States during the late 1940s and early 1950s The House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) decided to investigate Hollywood in 1947 More than 100 witnesses, including several of Hollywood’s top talents, were called before the committee Walt Disney testifying before the HUAC about possible communist activity by other members of Hollywood Video Lecture
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House Un-American Activities Committee On November 24, 1947, a group of eight screenwriters and two directors were sentenced to a year in prison for refusing to testify. They were later known as the Hollywood 10 The studios immediately fired the Hollywood 10 and then began blacklisting hundreds of people across Hollywood. This blacklisting lasted until 1960
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Greatest Threat to the Industry The film industry believed that the greatest threat to them, instead of the HUAC or the “Paramount decrees,” was the rise of television Studios attempted to diminish television’s appeal by using the two major advantages film had over television: the size of its screen and its ability to have films in color. In 1952, stereophonic sound joined this list This actually led to a change in aspect ratios (ratio of width to height for movies). Thus why we have widescreen movies An example of the differences in aspect ratios as they have adapted over time Video Lecture
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Trying to Keep Everything Normal Studios try to keep everything normal as they deal with both the end of the contract system, the “Paramount decree,” television, and the HUAC/blacklisting Studios now rely on star power such as Marlon Brando, Marilyn Monroe, James Dean, Grace Kelly, John Wayne, and Doris Day However, since these stars no longer
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