Bio 115 - Exam 2 Review + Q&A.docx

Bio 115 - Exam 2 Review + Q&A.docx - .

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Bio 115 - Exam 2 Review Day: Friday, 3/31/17 Time: 2PM to 5PM (come and go as you please) Place: Tillett Hall - Room 257 Format: This will NOT be a lecture-style review of content...if you have any questions about content, add them to this doc and I’ll answer them in blue . Instead, this will be a comprehensive review consisting of PRACTICE PROBLEMS from Exam 2 lecture material (lectures 10-18). Therefore, it is critical that you come ALREADY prepared with adequate content knowledge that so that you can APPLY this knowledge to answering exam-like questions! Exam 2 - Q&A I am freaking out about my grade right now. Is exam 2 usually harder than exam 1????? All the exams are roughly the same difficulty. You still have plenty of opportunities to raise your grade! I missed like three lectures from lectures 10-18; do you think I can make up for that on the bialigy website of yours and find everything I need from there that I missed in class? The site should cover everything. However, I’d still try and get lecture notes from someone to see what Dr. Keating may have explicitly emphasized in class. How do you solve for ploidy and the number of chromosomes in a daughter cell? Depends on the context given in the question...you need to look for things like whether meiosis I or meiosis II happened, what cell cycle phase(s) happened (G1, S, G2, etc), how many daughter cells, etc. Do your videos align with the class lecture notes? Pretty much. Genetic material is mostly in the form of a chromatin during the cell cycle correct? And when the protein and DNA that make up the chromatin becomes organized, it becomes a histone? Then a nucleosome is made from 8 histones with 146 nucleotide pairs of DNA and as more and more of the nucleosomes link via linker DNAs, a chromosome is formed? Correct, genetic material is mostly in the form of “chromatin” during the cell cycle. Chromatin is a “decondensed” state of genetic material. Histones and nucleosomes are always present, even at the chromatin level. What changes during “chromosome” formation is that the chromatin changes to a more compact, “condensed” state, which still consists of histones and nucleosomes, but the DNA itself becomes much more organized into that characteristic condensed chromatid structure. Take a look at this figure here . So a histone is just a protein correct? And the DNA wraps around it right? And 8 histones with the 146 nucleotide pairs of DNA make one nucleosome right? Yep, all good! Without this histone/nucleosome organization, our eukaryotic DNA would be all over the place, similar to prokaryotic DNA. It's a major differentiator between prokaryotic vs. eukaryotic genomes.
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
I’m still pretty confused about the difference of haploid and diploid number. Can you explain this to me and give an example?
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern