French_Part75.pdf - l'étudiant l'étudiante le...

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Unformatted text preview: l'étudiant l'étudiante le collège (classes 6-4) le collégien le lycée (classes 3-terminale) le lycéen student (m) [26] entendre to hear (of) student (f) jr. high school regarder to watch (grades 6-9) jr. high school student déjeuner to (have) lunch high school (grades 10-12) high school student Describing Teachers and Students intelligent(e) intelligent l'université (f) university la fac(ulté) nul(le) not good, not bright higher education l'enseignement supérieur strict(e) strict graduate school Des fournitures scolaires - School Supllies la craie le tableau le stylo(-bille) le crayon la calculatrice le livre le bouquin le cahier chalk the board pen pencil calculator cray tahbloh steeloh (bee) krayoh book leevr notebook kie ay le papier paper pahpeeyay la feuille de papier sheet of paper le bloc-notes (small) notepad block nut le classeur three-ring binder le sac à dos backpack sack ah doe la gomme eraser gum la règle ruler rehgluh le feutre marker feuhtr ^ The word professeur is considered masculine at all times, even if the teacher is female. The only case when "professeur" can be preceded by feminine determinant is either when contracting it in colloquial language "la prof", or when adding a few words before : "madame/mademoiselle la/le professeur". ^ The way that grades are numbered in France is opposite the way they are in the US. Whereas American grade numbers go up as you approach your senior year, they descend in France. ^ Écrire is an irregular verb. You will learn to conjugate it in the next section. ^ In French, you do not "own" body parts. While in English, you would say my hand or your hand, the definite article is almost always used in French. la main - my hand la jambe - my leg le bras - my arm For example, you would say Je me suis cassé la main (I have broken my hand) and never Je me suis cassé ma main. But you must say "Ma main est cassée" (My hand is broken) and not "La main est cassée" (lit. The hand is broken) if you speak about your own hand. ^ To and of are built into the verbs écouter and entendre respectively. It is not necessary to add a preposition to the verb. Other verbs, such as répondre {à), meaning to respond (to), are almost always followed by a preposition. EXERCISE • Translator ( ) • Exercise Appendix • Print version • E: 2.01 1 - School Vocabulary - Complétez [show ▼] ...
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