French_Part9.pdf - Nn like n in note/ɛn Oo closed approx...

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Unformatted text preview: Nn like n in note /ɛn/ Oo closed: approx. like u in nut open: like o in nose /o/ Pp like p in pen* /pe/ Qq like k in kite /ky/ see 'u' for details Rr Ss Tt force air through the back of your throat near the position of gargling, /ɛʀ/ but sounding soft like s in sister at beginning of word or with two s's /ɛs/ or like z in amazing if only one s like t in top /te/ Say the English letter e, /y/ but make your lips say "oo". /ve/ Vv like v in violin Depending on the derivation of the word, Ww /dubləve/ like v as in violin, or w in water Uu Xx either /ks/ in socks, or /gz/ in exit /iks/ Yy like ea in leak /igrək/ Zz like z in zebra /zɛd/ Final consonants In French, certain consonants are silent when they are the final letter of a word. The letters p (as in 'coup'), s (as in 'héros'), t (as in 'chat'), d (as in 'marchand'), and x (as in 'paresseux'), are generally not pronounced at the end of a word. They are pronounced if there is an e letter after ('coupe', 'chatte', 'marchande', etc.) Dental consonants The letters d, l, n,s, t, and z are pronounced with the tip of the tongue against the lower teeth and the middle of the tongue against the roof of the mouth. In English, one would pronounce these letters with the tip of the tongue at the roof of one's mouth. It is very difficult to pronounce a word like 'voudrais' properly with the d formed in the English manner. b and p Unlike English, when you pronounce the letters 'b' and 'p' in French, little to no air should come out of your mouth. In terms of phonetics, the difference in the French 'b' and 'p' and their English counterparts is one of aspiration. (This is not the same as the similarly-named concept of 'h' aspiré discussed below). Fortunately, in English both aspirated and unaspirated variants (allophones) exist, but only in specific environments. If you're a native speaker, say the word 'pit' and then the word 'spit' out loud. Did you notice the extra puff of air in the first word that doesn't come with the second? The 'p' in 'pit' is aspirated [pʰ]; the 'p' in 'spit' is not (like the 'p' in any position in French). Exercise ...
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