Ear_and_eye_disorders2014animation.ppt

Ear_and_eye_disorders2014animation.ppt - Eye and Ear...

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Eye and Ear Disorders Janet Czermak APRN-BC http://www.rxlist.com/eye_diseases_slideshow/article.htm#
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EYE ANATOMY Outer Layer Sclera- White Opaque Cornea- Transparent Corneo-sclera Sulcus Middle Layer Choroid – Blood Vessels Ciliary Bodies Iris – Contains Pupil Inner Most Layer Retina
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The Normal Eye eyesareus.org/.../Glaucoma_2003b.jpg
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The Normal Eye The front part of the eye is filled with clear fluid called intraocular fluid or aqueous humor provides nutrients for the avascular tissues of the eye, lens and corneal endothelium and removes unwanted debris its constant production, flow, and drainage is necessary for the health of the eye http://www.nei.nih.gov/photo/eyean/images/ NEA11_72.jpg
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Tracing the Aqueous Humor Produced by the ciliary body in the posterior chamber Travels around the lens and through the pupil to the anterior chamber where it interacts with the surface of the lens and corneal epithelium Drains out of the eye by two methods: at the angle of the iris and cornea through the trabecular meshwork into Schlemm’s canal, mixing with venous blood and then returning to the heart (80%) absorption by the uveoscleral pathway via interstitial spaces between the iris and ciliary muscle (20%)
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Chambers of the Eye Anterior contains aqueous humor Anterior – cornea/iris Posterior – iris/lens Posterior- vitreous cavity Vitreous- retina, optic disk, macula
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Refraction Ability of the eye to bend light rays Emmotropia normal parallel light through the lens at a distance of 6 meter (20 feet) or more Lens Convex – converge light rays Plus value = 1 diopter Concave – divert light rays Negative value = - diopter
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Refraction Accommodation Ciliary muscle contract and pupils constrict and converge. Eyes are consensual Myopia (nearsightedness ) Refraction occurs in front of the retina Elongation of the eyeball or excessive power of the client’s lens Can see well near but blurred distant vision Hyperopia (farsightedness ) Refraction occurs behind the retina Shortened eyeball or insufficient refractory power of the lens Can see objects at a distance ,blurred vision for object close Presbyopia Decreasing accommodation power Decreased elasticity of the lens and ciliary muscles Problems with near vision and reading
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Refraction testing Myopia (nearsightedness Jaegar chart or Newspaper 12-14 inches away If unable to read Use multiple fingers in front of face If unable to see Can person see light or dark
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Refraction testing Hyperopia (farsightednes s ) Snellen chart or E chart 20 feet from the chart Test each eye separately With and without glasses
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Cataracts Cataracts are clouding of the lens portion of the eye. The result is much like smearing grease over the lens of a camera and impairs normal vision.
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How does a cataract form?
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