Oddis_LIB112_s18.pdf - LIB 112 EXPOSITORY WRITING II...

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LIB 112: EXPOSITORY WRITING II I N T R O D U C T I O N t o L I T E R A R Y G E N R E S INSTRUCTOR: Kyle Oddis | OFFICE: White 105 | HOURS: Tues. & Thurs. 11AM 1:00PM | EMAIL: [email protected] This syllabus is your learning contract. It is your responsibility to read this syllabus carefully, in its entirety, in order to understand what is required of you as a contributing member of our classroom community. C O U R S E I N F O R M A T I O N Catalog Description This course applies LIB 111 skills to writing research papers and performing basic literary analysis. Students write coherent, well-documented papers, requiring library research and the synthesis of professional and popular sources. The literary analysis incorporates knowledge of literary concepts, devices, and techniques. Course Description In LIB 112, students will continue to develop critical reading, thinking, and writing practices by analyzing and responding to literary works that contemplate the concept of human dignity . As we consider what dignity means to human life and how we move through the world as we consider our own dignity and the dignity of others we will engage with texts in multiple genres that challenge us to confront issues affecting our personal and professional lives. Writing Intensive Statement MCPHS faculty believe that learning in all disciplines is an integrative process, a synthesis of critical reading, thinking, and writing. Students must not only learn to write but also write to learn. Consequently, this course has been designated as Writing Intensive (WI). Students will be required to write 15-20 pages, in 2 or more assignments which may take various forms as determined by the course instructor. In addition, instructors will dedicate class time to the teaching of writing in their specific disciplines, provide feedback on assignments, and allow revision of at least one assignment. Objectives Students with credit for LIB 111 are expected to demonstrate that they have already achieved the learning outcomes of that course (in particular, write relatively error-free prose, and find, integrate, and cite sources correctly). At the end of this course, successful students should be able to: 1. comprehend, evaluate, and summarize college-level readings; 2. recognize and evaluate sound and flawed arguments, fact, and opinion; 3. write coherent essays, including creating a strong thesis, developing logical analysis of their own ideas and others’, and organizing paragraphs with strong topic sentences and transition; 4. present their own and others’ views about a subject clearly, soundly, and accurately by evaluating, synthesizing, and documenting appropriate evidence; 5. quote and/or paraphrase all sources accurately, and cite them using correct citation format (MLA or APA); 6. effectively write various expository genres, including research papers and literary analyses; 7. determine and use an appropriate writing voice, with a strong sense of audience; 8. demonstrate an understanding of all aspects of the

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