Urbanization quickly took place in the second half of the nineteenth century in the United States fo

Urbanization quickly took place in the second half of the nineteenth century in the United States fo

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Last Name 1 Student Name Course Name Assignment Name Date Assignment Name Urbanization quickly took place in the second half of the nineteenth century in the United States for several reasons. The new technologies of the time allowed a significant advance in production, which required a large number of employees (Teaford). New bulbs and powerful machines enable the plants to work 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Employees have been forced to undergo heavy services for 12 hours, forcing them to live near factories (Teaford). While the work was dangerous and difficult, many Americans were willing to abandon the agricultural horizon in the hope of obtaining better wages in industrial employment. Also, the problems of famine and religious persecution led to a new wave of immigrants from central, eastern and southern Europe, many of whom settled and found work near the cities where they arrived (Teaford). The immigrants sought comfort and comfort from others who shared the same language and customs, and the cities of the nation became an invaluable economic and cultural resource. Although cities such as Philadelphia, Boston and New York emerged from the early days of colonization, the explosion of population growth in urban areas occurred only in the mid-
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Last Name 2 nineteenth century. At present, the attractions of urban life, especially jobs, have increased dramatically as a result of rapid changes in the manufacturing industry. In the mid-nineteenth century, factories, like the first textile factories, had to be located near rivers and ports, both for the cargo and for the necessary hydraulic energy (Teaford). The production depended on the seasonal flow of water, with a cold and icy winter, but all this completely stopped the fluvial transport (Teaford). The development of the steam engine has diverted this need, allowing companies to identify their facilities near urban centers. These factories encouraged more and more people to move to urban areas where jobs abounded, but wages were often low per hour, and work was routine and monotonous. In the end, the cities developed unique personalities based on the most critical industry that stimulated their growth. In Chicago, I was packing meat, in New York the clothing industry and the financial industry dominated, and Detroit, in the mid-twentieth century, was determined by automobiles built. But all cities today, regardless of their sector, have suffered global
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