AMIND 141 Final Exam Study Guide.pdf - AMIND 141 Final Exam Study Guide*Use this guide to focus your studying for the final exam 5 multiple choice 5

AMIND 141 Final Exam Study Guide.pdf - AMIND 141 Final Exam...

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AMIND 141 Final Exam Study Guide *Use this guide to focus your studying for the final exam* 5 multiple choice, 5 short answer, and 3 longer discussion/essay questions Anyone take the exam yet? I’ll be curious to hear if it is easy or not and what to expect -I took it the first multiple choice questions were the same as the last quiz and the short answers ones are the same from6,.# Same from what???? -Review all key terms from beginning of course (Weeks 1 and 2) -Indian Civil Rights Movement -Occupation of Alcatraz -Occupation of Wounded Knee -Indian Costume controversy -Pocahontas Myth -The Pocahontas Perplex -Indian Mascot controversy -"Proud to Be" commercial -#NoDAPL controversy -Self-Determination -Survivance Indian Civil Rights Movement The American Indian Civil Rights Movement emerged during the 1950’s, emphasizing a spiritual and cultural awakening after decades of attempts by the US government to force assimilation, legal rights for American Indians, and the return of lands taken from tribes illegally by the federal government. A return to termination policy after the the policy of self-determination under President Roosevelt’s “Indian New Deal” with the Termination Act of 1953 and a resurgence in assimilation efforts with the 1956 Indian Relocation Act helped to spark the movement. As the Civil Rights Movement began to gain momentum, young American Indians who had relocated from reservations to struggling urban areas were inspired by the fight for equal justice, and local, intertribal movements began within cities, usually organized around cultural centers. In 1968, the
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establishment of the American Indian Movement (AIM) brought a strong central organization to the cause, which helped to bring attention to a variety of issues facing American Indians. -Occupation of Alcatraz The Occupation of Alcatraz began in November of 1969 and lasted until 11 June, 1971 when the last fifteen occupiers were forcibly removed from the island. Its purpose was to speak out against termination policy and other forms of oppression against American Indians as well as to call for real change in the way they were treated by the US Government. This event was significant because it drew international attention to the issues Native Americans face, encouraged over two-hundred other acts of civil disobedience in the same spirit nationwide, and served as a platform for American Indian leaders to voice their concerns to the general public and the government The satirical tone of the Alcatraz Proclamation mimics that of the racially prejudiced, imperialistic treaties and Congressional acts made by the US government. It alludes to the doctrine of discovery, the purchase of Manhattan Island, the formation of the reservation system, the corruption of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the attempts at forced assimilation made by the federal government over centuries of injustice towards American Indian peoples.
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