toc_workshops.doc - Workshop Lectures The Clay Minerals...

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Workshop Lectures The Clay Minerals Society Volumes 1 to 16 Tables of Contents Volume 1, 1989, Quantitative Mineral Analysis of Clays D. R. Pevear & F. A. Mumpton, Editors Introduction………………………………………………………..….D. R. Pevear Principles and Techniques of Quantitative Analysis of Clay Minerals by X-ray Powder Diffraction……………………………………………..…..R. C. Reynolds Introduction Equations for Quantitative Analysis Basic quantitative diffraction equation Derivation of a working form of the equation for analysis Required Sample Characteristics Sample length Sample thickness 2:1 alignment of the sample Mineral homogeneity of the sample Preferred Orientation Effect of σ* on absolute intensity The angle-dependent effect of σ* Minimizing Compositional Effects
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Peak selection Mineral Reference Intensities Use of calculated mineral intensity factors Experimentally measured mineral reference intensities Comparison of calculated and measured reference intensities Calculated mineral reference intensities Practical examples of application of reference intensities Summary and Conclusions References Cited A Computer Program for Semi quantitative Mineral Analysis by X-ray Powder Diffraction……………………………………..J. W. Hosterman and F. T. Dulong Introduction User-Supplied Data Description of the Program Data smoothing Background determination Diffuse scattering Peak identification Estimating mineral percentages Program Output File Discussion and Summary Acknowledgments References Cited A Computer Technique for X-ray Diffraction Curve Fitting/Peak Decomposition………………………………………… .... R. C. Jones Introduction Convolution vs. Composition Description of convolution in the context of XRD Description of composition in the context of XRD Peak-Fitting Functions Symmetrical pseudo-Voigt, pure Gaussian, and pure Cauchy peak functions Split pseudo-Voigt peak function Symmetrical and split Pearson type-VII peak functions Pearson type-VII/pseudo-Voigt peak function Pseudo-Voigt/modified exponential peak function Background Options Lorentz-polarization factor Straight, zero-slope line background Straight, sloping-line background Quadratic distribution Gaussian and Cauchy background distributions Gaussian/modified exponential background distribution
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Significance of Peak Shapes Summary Acknowledgments References Cited Quantitative Mineral Analysis by X-ray Transmission and X-ray Diffraction………………………………...…B. L. Davis and L. R. Johnson Introduction Experimental Procedures Preliminary measurements Suspension and collection Post-loading sample preparation and measurements Data Analysis Selected Results Special Analytical Problems Summary Acknowledgments References cited Quantitative Determination of Clays and Other Minerals in Rocks………………………………………………………...Maynard Slaughter Introduction Theory Problem I. Mineral amounts Problem II. Mineral compositions
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