10 How plants defend themselves III - Copy

10 How plants defend themselves III - Copy - PP 315 / 590J...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
PP 315 / 590J  Lecture 10 How plants defend themselves III Objectives Understand the plant defense mechanisms against colonizing pathogens. Induced chemical defense  mechanisms are multifaceted, utilizing a variety of local and systemic responses. Plant Defense Mechanisms - Induced (Active) Chemical Resistance  (1) Hypersensitive Response (Hypersensitive Reaction) A hypersensitivity of plant cells to a pathogen was first described by Marshall Ward in 1902 to describe  one type of reaction observed when certain strains of a rust fungus were inoculated onto certain varieties  of brome grass.  [NOTE: This was a very specific response; it did not occur with all strains of the  pathogen on all varieties of the host] . The term  hypersensitive response (HR)  was used to describe this response in 1915 by E. C. Stakman.  He described this response as an "abnormally rapid death" of plant cells attacked by rust hyphae. He was  investigating rust diseases of oats, wheat, and barley caused by different isolates of the rust pathogen  Puccinia graminis.  He clearly distinguished this response from the longer period of time required to cause  necrosis during normal disease development.  A hypersensitivity of plant cells to a pathogen was first described by Marshall Ward in 1902 to describe  one type of reaction observed when certain strains of a rust fungus were inoculated onto certain varieties  of brome grass.  [NOTE: This was a very specific response; it did not occur with all strains of the  pathogen on all varieties of the host] . The term  hypersensitive response (HR)  was used to describe this response in 1915 by E. C. Stakman.  He described this response as an "abnormally rapid death" of plant cells attacked by rust hyphae. He was  investigating rust diseases of oats, wheat, and barley caused by different isolates of the rust pathogen  Puccinia graminis.  He clearly distinguished this response from the longer period of time required to cause  necrosis during normal disease development. 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Examples of HR reactions on tobacco and pepper.  Bacterial cells are infiltrated into intercellualr spaces  in the leaves under pressure and the water-soaked  area is observed over the next 24 hr. An HR is  confirmed if the cells in the area die and the tissue  collapses and becomes necrotic. The HR is considered to be a defense response and has been observed with fungi, viruses, bacteria and  nematodes. It was studied for many years only in association with biotrophic fungi, but it also occurs with  hemibiotrophic organisms (fungi and bacteria). RAPID CELL DEATH
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/22/2008 for the course PP 315 taught by Professor Shew during the Spring '08 term at N.C. State.

Page1 / 9

10 How plants defend themselves III - Copy - PP 315 / 590J...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online