Research Paper.docx - The United States has stood as a...

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The United States has stood as a strong representation of democracy since its founding in 1776 and continues to represent the message of freedom and equality for all people in the modern world. Or at least that’s what it would seem. Many Americans tote the line of “freedom” and “democracy", yet one of the major cornerstones of these values, the vote, seems to be lacking within the United States. of course that isn’t to say that voting is prohibited to anyone directly. Inthe United States, all people of any race, gender, and belief is allowed to vote so long as they meet certain requirements such as age, citizenship, etc. Yet despite all of this, a majority of American’s who so value their rights and freedoms, don’t vote. There are many culprits to this issue. Some merely jump to the conclusions that Americans are simply too lazy or don’t care enough to ever go out to the voting booth. And by all means I would not doubt this to be the casefor some Americans, however the problems and solutions to this issue are not so simple. With thepossible causes ranging from restrictive voting policies to outright disinterest of the voting population and solutions ranging from implementing foreign democratic voting policies to requiring mandatory voting from U.S. citizens. I will be evaluating these various problems to determine their validity and come to a conclusion on which solutions should be implemented to solve these problems.To start, the most commonly believed cause of low voter turnout is that many Americans are too lazy. The most direct solution to this problem would be to implement mandatory voting for all eligible Americans much like what is done in many other democratic countries. If this solution would work as intended, it would seemingly end any need for further discussion on what the cause of low turnout is. Whether you believe there are discriminatory policies for voting or Electoral competitiveness that discourages one from voting, none of it would matter if every American were forced to vote. The problem would be solved. Yet the question remains on if it
would work, or at least, work as well as it appears to in other countries. In Australia with a voter turnout of 90%, their implementation of mandatory voting is not likely to be the cause. "Registered voters who fail to vote get a form letter asking why; almost any excuse will do to getsomeone off the hook. Those with no valid excuse face a fine of about $20..." (USA today, 1). This would essentially change nothing for American voters as many would come up with any excuse as to why they didn’t vote. It would only add an extra step in the process of skipping that would only serve to annoy citizens. The solution would then be to make the punishment more harsh and removing the ability to so easily excuse yourself from the vote. But one must keep in mind that even this milquetoast "requirement" is already enough to raise concerns of constitutional violation as well as ethical concerns. So, to propose a more restrictive policy

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