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Running head: THEORY CRITIQUE1Theory CritiqueNikki Brown, BSN, RN, NP-SMaryville UniversityFebruary 18, 2018
THEORY CRITIQUE2Theory CritiqueThe profession of nursing has changed throughout the years, becoming more scientific, and seen more of an academic profession than before. Cheryl Cox created a theoretical framework when she noticed there needed to be more of a client-centered care. With the inspiration of several other health belief models, Cheryl Cox created the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior. This theory looked at the behavior of patients and the relationship between patient and nurse to ensure better patient outcomes and better adherence to a patient’s plan of care. The writer will critique this theory based on Chinn and Kramer’s model to facilitate reflective thinking. Description of TheoryCox believed there were limitations on the existing models of patient behavior because there was a lack of information about specific guidelines that nurses could use to guide their practice and provide better interventions for better compliance with a patient’s health behavior. Cox believed the existing models to be archaic due to following disease that were no longer concerns for today, more emphasis placed on families or communities rather than individual patients, but most importantly, overlooking the professional role in patient-nurse interaction (Cox, 1982).Cox started the theory by building a framework that would allow the nurse to view their patients as unique individuals that have different needs and behaviors related to their health behaviors, to recognize the areas of a patient-nurse relationship that are needed to facilitate behaviors that is conducive to better health outcomes, and provide clinical practice tailored to theindividual (Cox, 1982).
THEORY CRITIQUE3RationaleThe Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior is relevant to this writer’s practice because having a patient-nurse relationship is essential in her practice. This writer sees many cases each day that have a variety of symptoms and client behaviors. These behaviors could be positive or negative, and based on what is presented, could change during treatment. This writer

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