Circular motion lab.docx - Twiness Xu Per.2 Circular Motion Lab Purpose to explore circular motion and to analyze the relationship between centripetal

Circular motion lab.docx - Twiness Xu Per.2 Circular Motion...

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Twiness Xu Per.2 01/30/18 Circular Motion Lab Purpose: to explore circular motion and to analyze the relationship between centripetal force, radius of the path, and tangential velocity. Abstract: to understand that the centripetal force for an object to continue moving in a circle that is at a constant radius, at constant speed. The experiment was carried out by three parts to understand the relationship among hanging mass, radius of the path and centripetal force. To calculate the centripetal force, the weight of revolving mass, hanging mass, radius and time are necessary. Material: revolving mass, hanging mass, string, tube, tape (used as marker), timer. Illustration: FBD (Free Body Diagram): Procedure and Methods: Procedure Part I: Vary the centripetal force while the radius is held constant.
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Twiness Xu Per.2 01/30/18 1.Practice with the set-up. Stretch out the string and make sure it moves freely through the tube. Hold the tube in one hand and the end of the string without the stopper in the other. Whirl the stopper above your head and feel the force in the string. How does the force vary as you spin the stopper faster? 2. Measure a radius of about 70 cm. Record the exact radius in your data table (pull the string taut while measuring). Mark the string with tape so that you can keep the radius constant (there must be a constant gap between the tape and the tube). The string must be free to move through the tube. 3. Hang a 150 grams on the string. 4. Practice whirling the stopper in a circle while keeping the radius constant. Move the tube as little as possible. Keep the circular path of the stopper as horizontal as possible. The stopper is traveling at the desired speed when the weight on the string provides the necessary centripetal force to maintain the radius. When you can control the apparatus — keeping the radius constant — begin to record data. 5. Measure the time it takes to complete 10 revolutions while the stopper is moving with the desired rotational speed. Divide the time for 10 revolutions, by 10 to get the time for one revolution. 6. Add to the mass on the string and repeat the timing of 10 revolutions for two other mass values (250 and 350).
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