EE 302 - Lecture Slides - Unit_2[1].5___Series_and_Parallel_Circuits

EE 302 - Lecture Slides - Unit_2[1].5___Series_and_Parallel_Circuits

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Unit 2: Basic Circuit Theory Unit 2.5: Series and Parallel Circuits
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Learning Objectives Series Circuits Voltage sources Resistors Parallel Circuits Current Sources Resistors How do series circuits divide voltage How do parallel circuits divide current
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Review Ohm’s Law : V = IR or I = V/R Kirchhoff’s Voltage Law : An algebraic sum of all the voltages around a closed path (or loop) is zero. Sum of voltage drops = Sum of voltage rises Kirchhoff’s Current Law : An algebraic sum of the currents entering a node is zero. Sum of currents entering a node = Sum of currents leaving a node.
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Series Circuits Same current flows through them ( which law dictates that ? ) 1 2
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Series Circuits (Contd.) Req = ∑ R n Series circuits are voltage dividers To determine the voltage across the Nth resistor use the principle of voltage division. N N eq
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Parallel Circuits Share a common pair of nodes. Same voltage across parallel elements. (which law dictates that?) Applying KVL for each loop: v = i1 X R1 = i2 X R2 i = i1 + i2 i = v/R1 + v/R2 = v/Req => 1/Req = 1/R1 + 1/R2
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Parallel Circuits (Contd.) For N resistors in parallel: 1 2 3 N
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Parallel Circuits (Contd.) Parallel circuits are current dividers th
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Practice Problem Determine Req for the following circuit:
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Practice Problem Find V1, V2, V3 in the circuit.
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Practice Problem Find I, v, and the power dissipated in the 6 Ω resistor.
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Practice Problem Find i1 and i2
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Practice Problem Find R if Vo = 4V
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Equivalent Circuits An Equivalent Circuit is a simple circuit that reproduces
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This note was uploaded on 03/22/2008 for the course EE 302 taught by Professor Mccann during the Fall '06 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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EE 302 - Lecture Slides - Unit_2[1].5___Series_and_Parallel_Circuits

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