Assignment 6.pdf - Rowan Introduction to Astronomy Activity...

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Rowan Introduction to AstronomyActivity #6:Properties of Stars: The Hertzsprung-Russell DiagramName: _______________________________________________Score: ____________________________________AcknowledgementThis activity is adaptedfrom “The Life Cycles of Stars” developed forProject ASTRO NOVA by the Planetarium atRaritan Valley Community College (The New Jersey Astronomy Center for Education at Raritan Valley CommunityCollege, Somerville, NJ 088761265).ObjectiveStudents learn about these important properties shared by all stars: luminosity (brightness), temperature, and color.BackgroundIn the early 20thcentury (around 1910), Swedish astronomer Ejnar Hertzsprung and American astronomer HenryNorris Russell plotted the colors (temperatures) of stars against their luminosities (or brightness).The resulting graph represented a huge leap forward in understanding stellar evolution, or thelives of stars.The color and temperature of stars are usually plotted on thex-axis, with high temperatures to the left and low to theright. All temperatures are given in K, or Kelvin degrees.Luminosity (usually plotted on the vertical ory-axis) isgiven in terms of the Sun’s luminosity (either multiples or afractional part). Sometimes luminosity is replaced by the absolute magnitude of the star.Celestial objects appear in a vast range of brightness. For example our Sun appears 16 trillion times brighter than thefaintest stars visible to the naked eye. Clearly, some other means of expressing astronomical brightness is needed.Astronomers have developed what is called themagnitude scale: a logarithmic scale in which a difference ofexactly 5 magnitudes corresponds to a factor of 100 in brightness. Each magnitude corresponds to a factor of 2.512in brightness because 2.512×2.512×2.512×2.512×2.512 = 100. The magnitude scale runs from large positivenumbers for very faint objects to negative numbers for very bright objects. For example a star of magnitude 5 is 100times fainter than a star of magnitude 0. A star of magnitude1 is 2.512 times brighter than a star of magnitude 0.

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Term
Spring
Professor
RichardRusso
Tags
Stellar classification, White dwarf, main sequence, luminosity
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The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers
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Chapter 6 / Exercise 18
Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers
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