EOC Review Poetry - Paul Revere.pdf - "The Bloody Massacre...

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"The Bloody Massacre" and "The Bloody Massacre in King-Street, March 5, 1770." "The Bloody Massacre" and "The Bloody Massacre in King-Street, March 5, 1770." by Paul Revere The poem and engraving are provided courtesy of the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History. Unhappy Boston! see thy Sons deplore Thy hallow'd walks besmear'd with guiltless gore While faithless P____n and his savage bands With murd'rous rancour stretch their bloody hands 5 Like fierce barbarians grinning o'er their prey Approve the carnage and enjoy the day. If scalding drops from rage, from anguish wrung If speechless sorrow, lab'ring for a tongue Or if a weeping world can ought appease 10 The plaintive ghosts of victims such as these The patriot's copious tears for each are shed A glorious tribute which embalms the dead. But know, Fate summons to that awful goal Where Justice strips the murd'rer of his soul, 15 Should venal C___ts, the scandal of the land, Snatch the relentless villain from her Hand Keen execrations on this plate inscrib'd Shall reach a Judge who never can be brib'd. The unhappy sufferers were Mesr's Sam'l Gray, Sam'l Maverick, James Caldwell 20 Crispus Attucks, & Patr. Carr Killed Six wounded; two of them (Christ'r Monk & John Clark) mortally. ReadWorks.org · © 2017 ReadWorks®, Inc. All rights reserved. © 2015 The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History. All rights reserved. Used by Permission
"The Bloody Massacre" and "The Bloody Massacre in King-Street, March 5, 1770." Paul Revere, "The Bloody Massacre in King-Street, March 5, 1770." Boston, 1770. (Gilder Lehrman Collection) ReadWorks.org · © 2017 ReadWorks®, Inc. All rights reserved. © 2015 The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History. All rights reserved. Used by Permission
The American Revolution, 1763-1783 [excerpt] The American Revolution, 1763-1783 [excerpt] by Pauline Maier This essay excerpt is provided courtesy of the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History. This essay excerpt is provided courtesy of the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History. INDEPENDENCE The Seven Years' War had left Great Britain with a huge debt by the standards of the day. Moreover, thanks in part to Pontiac's Rebellion, a massive American Indian uprising in the territories won from France, the British decided to keep an army in postwar North America. Surely the colonists could help pay for that army and a few other expenses of administering Britain's much enlarged American empire. Rather than request help from provincial legislatures, however, Britain decided to raise the necessary money by acts of Parliament. Two laws, the Sugar Act (1764) and the Stamp Act (1765), began the conflict between London and America. The Sugar Act imposed duties on certain imports not, as in the past, to affect the course of trade-for example, by making it more expensive for colonists to import molasses from the non British than from the British West Indies-but to raise a revenue in America "for defraying the expense of defending, protecting, and securing the same." The Stamp Act levied entirely new excise

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