Comm Readings from Amy

Comm Readings from Amy - Harrison and Cantor (99) 11/4/2007...

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Harrison and Cantor (’99) 05/11/2007 01:47:00 4 research questions and answers     : o How prevalent and long-lasting are media induced fright reactions in a sample  of undergraduate college students? o Answer: 138/153 reported a fright reaction (independent of  whether they were going to receive extra credit or not)…26.4%  reported lasting effects (over 1 year)…over ½ reported  disturbances in normal behavior o What is the range of symptoms reported? o Choking, chest pains and tantrums were never reported as  symptoms; crying, screaming, trembling/shaking, and nausea  were most frequent symptoms reported o How closely do the media stimuli that evoke fright responses correspond with  the 5 fright-provoking stimulus types described in the  DSM-IV ? o Yes…about 98% could be categorized by 5 categories-most  prevalent were blood-injection and injury, disturbing sounds and  distorted images, situational stimuli o Which aspects of the viewing situation and types of stimuli predict enduring  effects? o Your reason for watching: most people watched it because  someone else wanted to watch it 2 hypothesizes     :
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o H1     : fright reactions to concrete/visual stimuli (scary animals, disturbing  sounds, distorted images, blood) will be more frequently reported by  participants who were very young at exposure o There is partial support—younger children were most disturbed by  concrete stimuli, but older kids were also most disturbed by blood o H2     : behavioral coping effects will be most frequently reported by participants  who were very young at exposure, whereas cognitive coping effects will be  most frequently reported by those older o This is true FIRST METHOD     : send home questionnaire, people can say no and still receive the  extra credit SECOND METHOD     : asks specific questions about what frightened them
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Comm 203 Readings: Linz et al. ‘88 05/11/2007 01:47:00 2 central themes:      Emotional desensitization to films of violence against women,  and effects of sexually degrading explicit or non-explicit films on rape and sexual  objectification of women Male subjects viewed either 1) R-rated violent 2) X-rated nonviolent “pornographic”  (depicting women as sexually degraded objects) 3) R-rated nonviolent “teen-sex” Also had no-exposure control subjects METHOD     (we’re only going to be tested on results listed in the abstract!—1 st  paragraph that introduces the study, major findings of entire investigation) After  exposure or non-exposure, subjects answered a questionnaire and viewed a  reenactment of a sexual assault case and judged the defendant and alleged rape 
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This note was uploaded on 03/22/2008 for the course COMM 203 taught by Professor Smith during the Fall '06 term at USC.

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Comm Readings from Amy - Harrison and Cantor (99) 11/4/2007...

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