Cognitive-Rigor-Matrix.pdf - Cognitive Rigor Matrix Blooms...

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Unformatted text preview: Cognitive Rigor Matrix Bloom’s Taxonomy and Webb’s Depth of Knowledge Fall 2012 Bloom’s Taxonomy • Originally written in 1956 by Benjamin Bloom • Educators often assign Bloom’s Taxonomy levels according to the main action verb of a question/task • Revised in 2001 by Anderson, Krathwohl, et al. • Emphasized both the processes (verbs) and the knowledge (nouns) • Changed the taxonomy levels from nouns to verbs • The top two levels of the taxonomy exchanged places Bloom’s Taxonomy • It uses verbs to differentiate taxonomy levels—many verbs appear at multiple knowledge levels and do not clearly articulate the intended complexity. Taxonomy Level Verbs Creating Evaluating Compare Analyzing Compare, Research Applying Calculate Understanding Calculate, Describe, Give examples, Locate, Research Remembering Describe, Give examples, Locate Same Verb—Three Different Levels of Knowledge • Describe 3 characteristics of metamorphic rocks. • Describe the difference between metamorphic and igneous rocks. • Describe a model that you might use to represent the relationships that exist within the rock cycle. Verbs • Verbs must be considered in context • What follows the verb is more important than the verb itself “Analyze this sentence to decide if the commas have been used correctly.” Webb’s Depth of Knowledge (DOK) • Written by Norman Webb (University of Wisconsin, 1997 and 1999) and the National Institute for Science Education. Extended Thinking Strategic Thinking Skills and Concepts Recall and Reproduction Webb’s Depth of Knowledge (DOK) • Is a scale of cognitive demand which aligns standards with assessments. • DOK addresses the content being assessed and the depth to which we expect students to demonstrate understanding of that content. • DOK is a reference to the complexity of mental processing that must occur to answer a question, perform a task, or generate a product. • DOK is about cognitive complexity, not difficulty. DOK Level 1 • Basic recall of concepts, definitions, facts, and processes • Follow a simple formula • Perform a routine procedure • Simple skills and abilities DOK Level 2 • Mental processing beyond recalling or reproducing a response • Requires decisions as to how to approach the question or problem • Perform two or more steps with decision points along the way • Organize or display data • Interpret or use simple graphs DOK Level 3 • • • • Reason or develop a plan to approach a problem Employ some decision-­‐making and justification Solve abstract, complex, or non-­‐routine problems Often allows more than one possible answer DOK Level 4 • Requires high cognitive demand and is very complex • Perform investigations or apply concepts and skills to the real world that require time to research, problem solve, and process multiple conditions • Make connections, relate ideas within the content or among content areas, and select or devise one approach among many alternatives on how the situation can be solved Smarter Balanced Assessments • There are content specification documents for both English language arts/literacy and mathematics. -­‐ balanced-­‐assessments/ • These documents provide a blueprint of how the CCSS will be assessed. • Each content specification document references Depth of Knowledge (DOK). Content Specifications for Mathematics, page 30 Content Specifications for ELA/Literacy, page 23 Hess’ Cognitive Rigor Matrix • Depth + Type of Thinking (verbs) • Explains to teachers how Bloom’s Taxonomy and Webb’s DOK levels are alike, yet different • Tool for examining the depth of understanding required for different tasks that initially seem to be at comparable levels of complexity • Is included in the appendices of the content specification documents – Mathematics, pages 92 & 93 – ELA/Literacy, page 79 Cognitive Rigor Matrix Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy Levels DOK 1 Remembering -­‐Recall or identify conversions, terms, facts -­‐Recall or locate basic facts, definitions, details, events -­‐Identify facts/details in text DOK 2 DOK 3 DOK 4 Cognitive Rigor Matrix Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy Levels DOK 1 Understanding -­‐Evaluate an DOK 2 -­‐Explain expression relationships -­‐Locate points on -­‐Use models or a grid or number diagrams to on number line explain concepts -­‐Solve a one-­‐step -­‐Make basic problem inferences or logical predictions from data or observations -­‐Select -­‐Explain appropriate relationships words -­‐Summarize -­‐Write simple -­‐Identify central sentences ideas -­‐Describe/explain how or why DOK 3 DOK 4 -­‐Use concepts to solve non-­‐routine problems -­‐Explain reasoning when more than one response is possible -­‐Explain, generalize, or connect ideas using supporting evidence -­‐Relate math concepts to other content areas -­‐Develop generalizations and apply to new situations -­‐Explain how concepts or ideas specifically relate to other content domains or concepts Cognitive Rigor Matrix Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy Levels DOK 1 DOK 2 DOK 3 DOK 4 Applying -­‐Follow simple procedures -­‐Calculate, measure, apply a rule -­‐Apply a formula -­‐Solve linear equations -­‐Make conversions -­‐Use language structure (pre/suffix) or word relationships (synonym/ antonym) to determine meaning -­‐Select a procedure and perform it -­‐Solve routine problems applying multiple concepts or decision points -­‐Use context to identify word meanings -­‐Obtain and interpret information using text features -­‐Write paragraph using appropriate organization, text structure -­‐Design an investigation for a specific purpose or research question -­‐Use reasoning, planning, and supporting evidence -­‐Use concepts to solve non-­‐ routine problems -­‐Revise final draft for meaning or progression of ideas -­‐Initiate, design, and conduct a project that specifies a problem, identifies solution paths, solves the problem, and reports results -­‐Devise an approach among many alternatives to research a novel problem Cognitive Rigor Matrix Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy Levels DOK 1 DOK 2 DOK 3 DOK 4 Analyzing -­‐Retrieve information from a table or graph to answer a question -­‐Identify a pattern/trend -­‐Identify the kind of information contained in a graphic, table, visual, etc. -­‐Categorize data, figures -­‐Organize, order data -­‐Select appropriate graph and organized & display data -­‐Extend a pattern -­‐Interpret data from a simple graph -­‐Compare literary elements, facts, terms, events -­‐Analyze format, organization, text structures -­‐Compare information within or across data sets or texts -­‐Analyze and draw conclusions from data, citing evidence -­‐Generalize a pattern -­‐Interpret data from complex graph -­‐Analyze or interpret author’s craft (literary devices, viewpoint, potential bias) to critique a text -­‐Analyze multiple sources of evidence or data sets -­‐Analyze multiple sources or multiple texts -­‐Analyze complex or abstract themes Cognitive Rigor Matrix Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy Levels Evaluating DOK 1 DOK 2 DOK 3 DOK 4 -­‐Cite evidence and develop a logical argument -­‐Compare/contrast solution methods -­‐Verify reasonableness -­‐Cite evidence and develop a logical argument for conjectures based on one text or problem -­‐Justify conclusions made -­‐Apply understanding in a novel way, provide argument or justification for the new application -­‐Evaluate relevancy, accuracy, & completeness of information across texts or sources -­‐Draw and justify conclusions Cognitive Rigor Matrix Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy Levels DOK 1 DOK 2 DOK 3 DOK 4 Creating -­‐Brainstorm ideas, concepts, problems, or perspectives related to a topic or concept -­‐Brainstorm ideas, concepts, problems, or perspectives related to a topic or concept -­‐Generate conjectures or hypotheses based on observations or prior knowledge and experience -­‐Generate conjectures or hypotheses based on observations or prior knowledge and experience -­‐Develop an alternative solution -­‐Synthesize information within one data set -­‐Develop a complex model or approach for a given situation -­‐Develop an alternative solution -­‐Synthesize information across multiple sources or data sets -­‐Design a model to inform and solve a practical or abstract situation -­‐Synthesize information across multiple sources or texts -­‐Articulate a new voice, alternate theme, new knowledge or new perspective “Learning is optimized when students are involved in activities that require complex thinking and the application of knowledge.” Hess, Carlock, Jones, & Walkup, 2009 References Anderson, Krathwohl, et al. (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing. New York: Longman. Hess, K. K., Carlock, D., Jones, B. S., & Walkup, J. R. (2009). What exactly do “fewer, clearer, and higher standards” really look like in the classroom? Using a cognitive rigor matrix to analyze curriculum, plan lessons, and implement assessments. Retrieved from -­‐bin/pubspage.cgi?sortby=pub_date Hess, K.K. (2004). Applying Webb’s Depth-­‐of-­‐Knowledge (DOK) Levels in reading. Retrieved from Hess, K.K. (2005). Applying Depth of Knowledge (DOK) Levels in writing. Retrieved from Hess, K. K., Jones, B. S., Carlock, D., & Walkup, J. R. (2009). Cognitive rigor: Blending the strengths of Bloom’s Taxonomy and Webb’s Depth of Knowledge to enhance classroom-­‐level processes. ERIC: ED517804 NYC Department of Education. Introduction to Depth of Knowledge [Video]. Available from Perkins, D. (Modified with permission from Pam Lowe). Depth of knowledge DOK [Poster]. Retrieved from Petit, M., & Hess, K. (2006). Applying Webb’s Depth of Knowledge and NAEP levels of complexity in mathematics. Retrieved from Smarter Balanced Assessments. Retrieved from -­‐balanced-­‐assessments/ Webb, N. L. (2002). Depth-­‐of-­‐Knowledge Levels for four content areas. Unpublished paper. Webb, N. L., et al. (2005). Web alignment tool. Retrieved from ...
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  • Spring '18
  • Kristen Bruce
  • Cognitive  Rigor  Matrix

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