Remembering, Recovering, and Writing Place (Ho\u02bbomanawanui, Ku\u02bbualoha).pdf - Hanohano Wailuanuiahono Remembering Recovering and Writing Place kuualoha

Remembering, Recovering, and Writing Place (Hoʻomanawanui, Kuʻualoha).pdf

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 57 pages.

187 Hülili: Multidisciplinary Research on Hawaiian Well-Being Vol.8 (2012) Copyright © 2012 by Kamehameha Schools. Hanohano Wailuanuiahoÿäno: Remembering, Recovering, and Writing Place kuÿualoha hoÿomanawanui correspondence may be sent to: kuÿualoha hoÿomanawanui, Department of English, University of Hawaiÿi at Mänoa Kuykendall 402, 1733 Donaghho Road, Honolulu, Hawaiÿi 96822 Email: [email protected] While the cultural and spiritual importance of Wailuanuiahoÿäno in traditional times was obscured by rapid Western colonization in the 19th and early 20th centuries, this region of Kauaÿi is a major place in Hawaiian history, culture, and moÿolelo (stories). Wailua’s prominence as a significant wahi pana (storied place) extends from the ancient to the historical past, and into the present for Känaka Maoli (Native Hawaiians) today. Remembering, recovering, and writing place provides an indigenous framework for cultural studies that complements other academic disciplines where memory is not always considered a relevant resource.
Image of page 1
188 HüLILI Vol.8 ( 2012 ) FIGURE 1 East face of Waiÿaleÿale from the back of Nounou, showing Kaipuhaÿa (Wailua Homesteads area) today 2005, kuÿualoha hoÿomanawanui He ÿäina kaulana nö ÿo Kauaÿi i nä wahi pana, a he mokupuni i kähiko ÿia e ka nani, a i ö wale ai nö kona mele kaulana, “Maikaÿi Kauaÿi Hemolele i ka Mälie” Kauaÿi is indeed a land famous with sacred legend-filled sites, it is an island adorned in beauty, of which the famous song says, “Beautiful is Kauaÿi, Perfect in the Calm” 1 W ailuanuiahoÿäno is an important wahi pana (storied place) and the most sacred region on Kauaÿi. Its rich history is documented by many moÿolelo (histories, stories, literature) attached to particular places. This article focuses on the ahupuaÿa (land division) of Wailua, Kauaÿi, and the importance of remem- bering, recovering, and writing about place as another dimension of ÿike ÿäina, knowledge from and about the lands we live on, and to which Känaka Maoli (Native Hawaiians) are culturally and genealogically connected. In a previous Hülili article on ÿäina (land) and culturally based literature ( 2008 ), I argued that the connection
Image of page 2
189 HO‘OMANAWANUI | HANOHANO WAILUANUIAHO‘äNO between Känaka Maoli and ÿäina forms the basis of indigenous literacy. I raised the challenge issued by 19 th-century Native Hawaiian educator J. H. Känepuÿu to other school teachers to collect and publish information about their own ÿäina, concluding that doing so would “be a great benefit to enlighten the people [and]… teach our students about the different aspects of our lands.” 2 Känepuÿu recog- nized the value of such knowledge to Hawaiian students educated in a colonially designed public school system that lacked texts celebrating Hawaiian intellectual traditions, which contributed to the erosion of Hawaiian well-being. Over the past 30 years, culturally centered Hawaiian education has grown in response to the overall dismal performance and experience of Kanaka Maoli students in a colo- nially constructed public educational system. Beginning with the establishment
Image of page 3
Image of page 4

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture