syllabus_phd2016.pdf - E880 Graduate Public Economics...

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E880 Graduate Public Economics: Empirical and Quantitative Methods Spring Semester 2016 Sebastian Findeisen Andreas Peichl This syllabus is tentative and might change over the semester. Course Description: The course covers empirical methods needed for research in Public Fi- nance, with emphasis on combining theoretical models with empirical evidence for the the optimal design of tax and social insurance policies. Topics include efficiency costs and incidence of taxation, income taxation, behavioral responses to taxes and transfers, social insurance and capital income taxation. Expected skills acquired after completion of the module: Understanding of modern methods used in Public Finance and ability to implement them. Understanding and knowledge of the research frontier in the field. Understanding how empirical research and economic theory can be used to- gether to address questions of optimal policy design. Lecture: Mondays 13:45 - 15:15 and Thursday 10:15 - 11:45 (weekly), find the exact schedule on the ILIAS webpage Credits: 10 ECTS Prerequisite(s): E700-E703, E801-E806 (or equivalent) Grading: There will be an assigned referee report (counting for 30% of the final grade). Addi- tionally, students have to present a research paper from the existing literature (30%) and an own research proposal (30%). There will also be some weight on participation in class lectures (10%). 1
Topics and Readings Exact readings may change over the semester. Background Reading A. Atkinson and J. Stiglitz, Lectures on Public Economics. McGraw Hill, 1980. A. Auerbach and M. Feldstein, eds., Handbook of Public Economics (5 volumes). Amsterdam: North Holland, 1985, 1987, 2002, 2003 and 2013. A. Angrist and J.S. Pischke, Mostly Harmless Econometrics. Princeton University Press, 2008. Guido Imbens, and Jeffrey Wooldridge (2007) Whats New in Econometrics? NBER Summer Institute Mini Course. nber.org/minicourse3.html Education Policies Findeisen, Sebastian, and Dominik Sachs. ”Designing Efficient College Education and Tax Policies.” (2014). Zimmerman, Seth D. ”The returns to college admission for academically marginal students.” Journal of Labor Economics 32.4 (2014): 711-754. Card, David. ”The causal effect of education on earnings.” Handbook of labor economics 3 (1999): 1801-1863. Angrist, Joshua D., and Alan B. Krueger. ”Does Compulsory School Attendance Affect Schooling and Earnings?.” Quarterly Journal of Economics 106.4 (1991): 979-1014.

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