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Unformatted text preview: Sexual Abuse Contents I. II. III. IV. Dynamics of Rape Social/Cultural Factors Personal and Psychosocial factors Conclusion Many researches have utilized content analysis methodology to examine the issue of rape among the population within a society. Professionals, victims and aggressors have also come up with descriptions of the physical and psychological aspects of rape to show the social structure of the sexual abuse sub-culture. Rape has been interpreted as obtaining by physical force, and or intimidation, a sexual relation with another person (Scacco, 1982). However, the statue differ among the states regarding the legal definition of rape, where in many cases it is referred to sexual intercourse against the will of a victim. Thus, rape is a forcible sexual assault, and it is an offence due to it being anon-consenting and forceful. Further, the criminal codes of every state describe it as an illegal behavior, and a felony punishable by different degrees of penalties (Scacco, 1982). Rape can be further defined as any sexual act, an attempt to get a sexual act, unwanted sexual advances, and using physical force by any individual regardless of the relationship with the victim in any setting (). Additionally, a wide range of behaviors such as rape at gun-point and coercion under a threat, for example false agreement, can be classified as an act of sexual abuse. Rape can take place in many forms under different circumstances. For instance, a person can be sexually violated by one person, or the incidents may be planned or carried out in surprise. Dynamics of Rape Many researchers have analyzed the driving force and motivations for sexual aggressive behaviors and they summarized the underlying factors in any sexually violent acts to be control and power and not as perceived to be a craving for sex. In many cases, it is a violent and hostile act used to degrade, dominate and control women. Its hostility and aggressiveness as displayed by the perpetrator are intention of threatening the sense of self for victims. It is a complex matter of common themes in trying to unravel the reasons as to why an individual would consciously choose of engage in a sexual abuse. Common themes have emerged such as sexual violent acts serves as a way of compensating feelings of happiness, to assert an identity, retain status among the peers, achieve sexual gratification and as a way of discharging frustration (Gavey, 2005). Social/Cultural Factors Many factors increase the risks of a person being coerced into sex or an individual forcing sex on another person. Some of these factors are associated with social attitude, beliefs and behavior of the involved individual. Many of these factors are rooted in the social conditioning as well as the community environment. These factors influence the likelihood of rape in addition to its reactions. Personal and Psychosocial factors A number of factors that lead to person’s involvement in sexual violent acts are in existence. Such individual factors include coercive sexual fantasies, including the impulsive and antisocial tendencies (Bartol & Bartol, 2005). These are normally supported by the psychosocial factors that support male superiority and male entitlement to sex. The personal and psychosocial factors vary from person to person. Conclusion The reality of sexual abuse, rape, differs from what people really believe. It is thus easier for individuals and the society at large to accept the myths surrounding sexual violence rather than challenging the accepted views of what constitute appropriate sexual behavior. For instance, men are normally seen as sexual aggressors, while women are expected to be sexually passive and refrain from initiating sexual activity. These prevailing myths greatly affect the ways in which a society responds to instances of rape and rape victims. Bibliography Bartol, C. R., & Bartol, A. M. (2005). Criminal behavior: A psychosocial approach. Upper Saddle River, N.J: Pearson. Gavey, N. (2005). Just sex?: The cultural scaffolding of rape. London: Routledge. Scacco, A. M. (1982). Male Rape analysis: A Case Book of Sexual Aggressions today, New York: AMS Press ...
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