Acid Rain Lab 1.docx - Kacee Gillis Chem1 Kulhanek Acid...

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Kacee Gillis Chem1 10/2/16 Kulhanek Acid Rain Lab Abstract: An acid rain lab was conducted where simulated acid rain was made and the pH levels which occurred were observed and calculated. Different solids were placed into pipets and mixed with hydrochloric acid in order to produce acidic gases, which were then pushed into water. A pH sensor was in the water, which measured the pH before and after the gas was emitted into it. This results of the experiment showed the levels of the pH decreased after the gases were in the water. This shows how different gases mixing with water can cause real world pollutants in the environment. Conducting this experiment shows how important it is to understand how acids form and how they work. Introduction: In our acid lab experiment, we made different gas products from solids being mixed with hydrochloric acid. We then measured the pH of the different gases using a pH sensor, which was placed in water. pH is a type of measurement, which measures the acidity levels or basic levels of different substances. The pH scale goes from 0 to 14. Anywhere on the scale between 0-6 is considered acidic, and anything on the scale from 8-14 is considered basic. Water is considered neutral and falls on the scale at 7. This is why we put our pH sensor in water and released the gases inside in the water. The water is our controlled substance, which has a neutral pH. The purpose of our experiment was to see the changes in pH when we put the different gases (NO 2 , CO 2 , and SO 2 ) into the neutral water solvent. We wanted to understand the changes, which are made and why they could affect the world around us. The prediction, which seemed most common was that our pH would go down in every run through, because we were putting gases from acids into the water, and acids fall on the pH scale as 6 and below. If acids fall on the lower side of the pH scale, it only made sense that our pH would decrease as the gases were pushed
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into our solvent. The acid rains, which we produced in our experiment were concluded to be
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